Vinegar Aids Post Exercise Glycogen Repletion  

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Nandi
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20/07/2018 6:20 am  

Int J Sports Med 2002 Apr;23(3):218-22

The efficacy of acetic acid for glycogen repletion in rat skeletal muscle after exercise.

Fushimi T, Tayama K, Fukaya M, Kitakoshi K, Nakai N, Tsukamoto Y, Sato Y.

Central Research Institute, Mitsukan Group Co. Ltd., Handa, Japan. tfushimi@mitsukan.co.jp

We examined the effect of acetic acid, the main component of vinegar, on glycogen repletion by using swimming-exercised rats. Rats were trained for 7 days by swimming. After an overnight fast, they were subjected to a 2-hr swimming exercise. Immediately afterward, they were given by gavage 2 ml of one of the following solutions: 30 % glucose only or 30 % glucose with 0.4 % acetic acid. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation before, immediately after exercise and 2 hours after the feeding. Exercise significantly decreased soleus and gastrocnemius glycogen content, and feeding significantly increased liver, soleus and gastrocnemius glycogen content. In soleus muscle, acetate feeding significantly increased glycogen content and the ratio of glycogen synthase in the I form (means +/- SEM: 4.04 +/- 0.41 mg/g-tissue and 47.0 +/- 0.7 %, respectively) in contrast to no acetate feeding (3.04 +/- 0.29 mg/g-tissue and 38.1 +/- 3.4 %, respectively). Thus, these findings suggest that the feeding of glucose with acetic acid can more speedily accelerate glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle than can glucose only.


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monkeyballs
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20/07/2018 7:00 am  

Pickles and power gels post workout?

Is it actually worth it?

I can't really extrapolate those numbers to a human standard...

are those increases significant when translated to a 6'1 200 lbs rat?


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monkeyballs
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20/07/2018 7:56 am  

Re: Vinegar Aids Post Exercise Glycogen Repletion

Posted by: Nandi12
Rats were sacrificed by decapitation before, immediately after exercise and 2 hours after the feeding. .

Do you think the scientist wore some kind of ritualistic headdress?


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GEORGE YOUNG
(@george-young)
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20/07/2018 8:42 am  

HMMM, 2ML??? HOW BIG WERE THESE RATS???? I WOULD IMAGINE THAT BEING A VERY LARGE DOSE OF VINEGAR FOR ME TO TAKE POST WORKOUT....

GY....


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Nandi
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20/07/2018 9:37 am  

Here is a link to the study:

The concentration of acetic acid was 0.2 gm per 100 gm of food ingested. Regular household vinegar is about 5% acetic acid. To get 0.2 gm of acetic acid you would need to drink 4.0 grams of vinegar. Vinegar's density (1.0056 g/cm3) is about like that of water, so drink 4 cc per 100 grams of food.

If you are carb loading before an event, you could take in 4cc for each 100 grams of carbs you eat.

The authors concluded that:

Here we have confirmed that a diet containing acetic acid at concentrations similar to those consumed in a normal meal enhances glycogen repletion in the liver and skeletal muscles of rats (Fig. 1A , B , C ). The effect in liver and gastrocnemius muscle appeared to be linear up to 0.2 g acetic acid/100 g diet.

Our results show that dietary acetic acid can enhance glycogen repletion in both liver and skeletal muscle. The mechanism of this effect is different in liver and skeletal muscle. In liver, acetic acid feeding enhances glycogen repletion by activation of gluconeogenesis and the preferential utilization of G-6-P for glycogenesis. In skeletal muscle, the enhancement of glycogen repletion by acetic acid feeding results from the accumulation of G-6-P due to suppression of glycolysis. We used acetic acid at concentrations comparable to those found in a normal diet. Therefore, we conclude that supplementing meals with vinegar may be beneficial in the recovery of liver and skeletal muscle glycogen, for example, upon fatigue, after skipping meals, postexercise or as part of an athlete�s breakfast on the day of competition.

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saint808
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20/07/2018 10:24 am  

Re: Re: Vinegar Aids Post Exercise Glycogen Repletion

Posted by: monkeyballs
Do you think the scientist wore some kind of ritualistic headdress?

i really don't have anything pertinent to add however this was one of the funniest things i have ever read.

Disclaimer:
saint808 is presenting fictitious opinions and does in no way, shape or form encourage, use nor condone the use of any illegal substances or the use of legal substances in an illegal manner. The information discussed is strictly for entertainment purposes only and shall not take the place of qualified medical advice.

To quote Oscar Wilde, "They say we destroy the things we love, but really the things we love destroy us."

It's strange, how laughter looks like crying, with no sound and rain drops taste like tears, without the pain.


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monkeyballs
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20/07/2018 11:16 am  
Posted by: Nandi12
Here is a link to the study:

The concentration of acetic acid was 0.2 gm per 100 gm of food ingested. Regular household vinegar is about 5% acetic acid. To get 0.2 gm of acetic acid you would need to drink 4.0 grams of vinegar. Vinegar's density (1.0056 g/cm3) is about like that of water, so drink 4 cc per 100 grams of food.

If you are carb loading before an event, you could take in 4cc for each 100 grams of carbs you eat.

The authors concluded that:

Here we have confirmed that a diet containing acetic acid at concentrations similar to those consumed in a normal meal enhances glycogen repletion in the liver and skeletal muscles of rats (Fig. 1A , B , C ). The effect in liver and gastrocnemius muscle appeared to be linear up to 0.2 g acetic acid/100 g diet.

Our results show that dietary acetic acid can enhance glycogen repletion in both liver and skeletal muscle. The mechanism of this effect is different in liver and skeletal muscle. In liver, acetic acid feeding enhances glycogen repletion by activation of gluconeogenesis and the preferential utilization of G-6-P for glycogenesis. In skeletal muscle, the enhancement of glycogen repletion by acetic acid feeding results from the accumulation of G-6-P due to suppression of glycolysis. We used acetic acid at concentrations comparable to those found in a normal diet. Therefore, we conclude that supplementing meals with vinegar may be beneficial in the recovery of liver and skeletal muscle glycogen, for example, upon fatigue, after skipping meals, postexercise or as part of an athlete�s breakfast on the day of competition.

So post workout drink 2ml of regular white vinegar with 50 grams of carbs...

correct?

I wonder if it would be benificial to put a little vinegar in a sports drink to improve recovery during a workout.

This post was modified 5 months ago by Admin
This post was modified 4 months ago by Admin

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monkeyballs
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20/07/2018 11:59 am  

Re: Re: Re: Vinegar Aids Post Exercise Glycogen Repletion

Posted by: saint808
i really don't have anything pertinent to add however this was one of the funniest things i have ever read.

Glad you enjoyed it bro...

I chuckled all day at the though of those sacrificial rats in something like a scene from indiana jones.


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Nandi
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20/07/2018 12:46 pm  

I've started just drinking the 2cc/50 gm carbs of cider vinegar post workout, and with breakfast. It actually doesn't taste as shitty as I thought it would. I tried it in my post workout shake and that was bad; it is easier just to chug it down.


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monkeyballs
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20/07/2018 1:39 pm  

Cider vinegar has just made its way onto my training table.

Great find nandi...a supplement that works and only costs two dollars.


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monkeyballs
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20/07/2018 2:30 pm  

FYI...
I tried adding two mls of cider vinegar to my warpaide (a legit version of gatorade) that I drink during my workouts.

Never again. Few things are less refreshing than vinegar. Simply unbearble. Maybe a swig or two straight from the bottle post workout, but never during. Trust me.


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Nandi
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20/07/2018 3:03 pm  

I've grown fond of the taste already, but have not chugged any down and gone for a sprint immediately afterward I confess.

I swear it is making me leaner. If you look at the study the mechanism whereby the vinegar increases glycogen storage in muscle is by retarding glycolysis. So when you eat a carb meal, more of the carbs are being stored as glycogen and fewer are being burned as fuel. The logical corollary is that fat is being burned as fuel instead.

Actually this is how carbs make a person fat. There is almost no "de novo" fat production from carbohydrates in humans. When you eat carb calories over and above an isocaloric amount, the carbs are preferentially used as fuel instead of fat. So fat that would be otherwise lost to fuel isn't. The acetic acid is blocking this effect to some extent.

So it really is true that "carbs don't make a person fat; fat makes a person fat". Excess carbs keep you fat, allowing any other dietary fats to be stored rather than burned.


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monkeyballs
(@monkeyballs)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 33
20/07/2018 3:46 pm  

FYI...
I tried adding two mls of cider vinegar to my warpaide (a legit version of gatorade) that I drink during my workouts.

Never again. Few things are less refreshing than vinegar. Simply unbearble. Maybe a swig or two straight from the bottle post workout, but never during. Trust me.


ReplyQuote
Nandi
(@nandi)
Estimable Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 142
21/07/2018 4:41 am  

I've grown fond of the taste already, but have not chugged any down and gone for a sprint immediately afterward I confess.

I swear it is making me leaner. If you look at the study the mechanism whereby the vinegar increases glycogen storage in muscle is by retarding glycolysis. So when you eat a carb meal, more of the carbs are being stored as glycogen and fewer are being burned as fuel. The logical corollary is that fat is being burned as fuel instead.

Actually this is how carbs make a person fat. There is almost no "de novo" fat production from carbohydrates in humans. When you eat carb calories over and above an isocaloric amount, the carbs are preferentially used as fuel instead of fat. So fat that would be otherwise lost to fuel isn't. The acetic acid is blocking this effect to some extent.

So it really is true that "carbs don't make a person fat; fat makes a person fat". Excess carbs keep you fat, allowing any other dietary fats to be stored rather than burned.


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JGUNS
(@jguns)
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21/07/2018 5:34 am  

Sprints Nandi?
How are they working?


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