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Vitamin D and Thryroid


Bellina
(@bellina)
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I thought this was a good topic since JB brought up the Testosterone point. I actually found out by accident how much of an impact that vitamin d has on thryoid conversion. Having changed nothing with the exception of adding in vitamin d I had to drastically cut back my thyroid dosage (hypothyroid).

Vitamin D is an important vitamin that not only regulates calcium, but also has many other beneficial actions. Not many endocrinologists realize this, but several articles published over 20 years ago showed that patients with hypothyroidism have low levels of vitamin D.

This may lead to some of the bone problems related to hypothyroidism. It was thought that one of two mechanisms may explain the low levels of vitamin D in patients with hypothyroidism, 1) the low levels of vitamin D may be due to poor absorption of vitamin D from the intestine or 2) the body may not activate vitamin D properly. Other articles have demonstrated that patients with Graves disease also have low levels of Vitamin D.

Importantly, both vitamin D and thyroid hormone bind to similar receptors called steroid hormone receptors. A different gene in the Vitamin D receptor was shown to predispose people to autoimmune thyroid disease including Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. For these reasons, it is important for patients with thyroid problems to understand how the vitamin D system works.

Vitamin D itself is inactive and needs to get converted to the liver to 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OH vitamin D) and then in the kidney to 1, 25-hydroxy vitamin D. It is only the 1, 25- OH vitamin D which is biologically active. This form of vitamin D acts to allow for absorption of calcium from the intestinal tract. Therefore, patients with low vitamin D levels will have low calcium and in severe cases get rickets (in children) or osteomalacia (in adults) which is when the bone bows out and is poorly formed. In mild cases of vitamin D deficiency, osteoporosis occurs, but low calcium is rare.

The conversion from the 25-OH vitamin D to the 1, 25-OH vitamin D that occurs in the kidney is catalyzed by parathyroid hormone, also called PTH. Therefore, patients with very low vitamin D levels will have relatively high PTH levels often with low calcium levels.

This is similar to patients with primary hypothyroidism having elevated TSH levels while having normal thyroid hormone levels. Additionally, the 25-OH vitamin D form which is the storage form and is much more abundant that the 1, 25-OH vitamin D form which, although is active, is less abundant. Therefore, in states of vitamin D deficiency, low levels of 25-OH vitamin D are found, but the 1, 25-OH vitamin D levels are either normal or actually slightly high. They are slightly high because the excess PTH that is stimulated by the low 25-OH vitamin D levels stimulates the conversion up to 25-OH vitamin D to the 1, 25-OH vitamin D. Thus, patients that are vitamin D deficient usually have a low 25-OH vitamin D level, a high PTH level, a low normal calcium, and a normal or an elevated 1, 25- OH vitamin D level. However some patients may actually have a high normal calcium as the elevated PTH and 1, 25-OH vitamin D may cause increased calcium absorption from the GI track and reabsorption from the kidney. If 25-OH vitamin D levels were not measured, these patients might have been incorrectly diagnosed with mild hyperparathyroidism as they have a high normal calcium and a high PTH.


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specialized
(@specialized)
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So , eat D and get your thyroid function back up ?

Just another cyclist..


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Bellina
(@bellina)
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Posted by: specialized
So , eat D and get your thyroid function back up ?

Has worked for me...I take at least 2000 ius daily. Having been on thyroid for years I was still having conversion issues. T4 would be normal but my t3 was always low.


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Tazmaniac
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Interesting. I'm going to have to try this and recommend to my sister as well. My sister and I have had problems with hypothyroidism. We both thought it may have been passed down from our mom since she's dealt with it as well.

Disclaimer:
Information that Tazmaniac presents is totally fictitious in nature and is presented for role playing purposes only. The opinions presented do not encourage the use of illegal substances nor take the place of professional medical advice.

Death gotta be easy, cause life is hard...it'll leave you physically, mentally, and emotionally scarred~50 Cent


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jboldman
(@jboldman)
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i have been supplementing with vit d for some time now and have just increased my dose due to these threads. i found some awesome gummy D's with 1000units of vit d!


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Bellina
(@bellina)
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Posted by: jboldman
i have been supplementing with vit d for some time now and have just increased my dose due to these threads. i found some awesome gummy D's with 1000units of vit d!

JB I get the NSI brand from vitacost. They are very affordable and they are available from 1000 ius to 5000 ius per cap. They carry your gummy kind too. Just saw those in the new catalog.

Dario all supplements are not created equal. Since supplements are not regulated it is important to go with quality reputable products.


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Magnesium
(@magnesium)
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look at the active ingredients and see if they are the same. Many times they have the same quantity per serving of active ingredient but different brand.
Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is what is formed by your skin in reaction to your sun and seems to be the most available form from the store. Wikipedia also has a good list of other forms and what the sources of them are.


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arnoldclab
(@arnoldclab)
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Vitamin D is now being recognized as a very important hormone.It's not snake oil or a scam.It's based on science.Some supplements are.Vit D isn't.Most people don't get enough and are seriously deficient.Sunlight is the best way.But they've scared everyone from getting some sun.All you need is 15 minutes a day.Darker skin people need a lot more.


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liftsiron
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Posted by: Bellina
Has worked for me...I take at least 2000 ius daily. Having been on thyroid for years I was still having conversion issues. T4 would be normal but my T3 was always low.

Some time ago I started taking 2000ius ed and believe that it has been easier to get lean.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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Bananaman
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Posted by: liftsiron
Some time ago I started taking 2000ius ed and believe that it has been easier to get lean.

Started 1000iu/ day this week, strangley my appetite is mazzively down; can't think of a good reason why the Vit D could cause this, but might explain your comment about getting lean- did your appetite change?


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Bellina
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Low levels of vitamin D affect the brain's production of the hormone leptin. Leptin plays a vital role in controlling appetite and metabolism; so as the amount of vitamin D in our bodies decreases so does the leptin, and this causes an increase in our appetite and a change in our metabolism.


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Cowgirl
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I get a lot of D in my Carlsons fish oil

Hi Bellina...long time no see!


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Bellina
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Posted by: Cowgirl
I get a lot of D in my Carlsons fish oil

Hi Bellina...long time no see!

How are ya? Yep it's been a eons!


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symondhelly
(@symondhelly)
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An overactive thyroid gland quickly uses up certain vitamins, causing them to become dangerously deficient. The B vitamins are responsible for our mental health. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, and it can be acquired either by ingestion or exposure to sunlight. It is known as the "sunshine" vitamin because the action of the sun ultraviolet rays activates a form of cholesterol present in the skin, converting it to vitamins D. However air pollution, clouds and window lass inhibits the sun action on the skin. Foods containing high amounts of natural vitamin d are: cod liver oil, salmon, sardines, herring, egg yolk, organ meats and bone meal.

Too much thyroid hormone uses up essential fatty acids EFA, which the thyroid gland needs to function normally. In one study, rats deprived of EFA became hyperactive with excessive thyroid hormone production. The two families of essential fatty acids are omega-6 (linolic acid), found in seeds and seed oils and omega-3 found mainly in fish, fish oils (cod liver oil) and green leafy vegetables.


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