EPO: Duration of effect and recovery protocol?  

Page 2 / 2
  RSS

fhg43
(@fhg43)
Active Member
Joined:2 months  ago
Posts: 12
06/08/2018 3:39 am  
Posted by: triguy
how high was your ferritin levels?

when i was taking feosol (oral iron from savons) and doing my hypoxic tent, my ferritn was like 1,200! but my rbc was 5.0, hgb 16!, hct 49! and no AS or epo. Also it is a tricky thing to read blood work , cause you also got to take in acct:

Kick ass!!! I take the same iron supp, Ferosol. But I don't have a tent!

FHG

I need a new slogan....and a new picture


ReplyQuote
monkeyballs
(@monkeyballs)
Eminent Member
Joined:1 month  ago
Posts: 22
06/08/2018 9:49 am  

a ferritin level of 1200???

Holy shit. I've never gotten over 220.

Levels that high are probably worse for you than a healthy amount of EPO and AS.

Also, I'm not sure how important ferritin levels are, as my roomates are totally natural and have crits over 50. Their ferritin levels are only 180-220 range. I'm not sure if levels that high would be of any advantage at all...and could possibly be harmful.

For what its worth...I use liquid iron from wild oats. Great shit. Tastes good too.

And fhg, you don't need a tent...your mountain air will suffice.


ReplyQuote
knutzen3
(@knutzen3)
New Member
Joined:1 week  ago
Posts: 1
06/08/2018 10:32 am  
Posted by: fhg43
Here is the study was referencing. Once again those jacked up rats come into play...

Funny...the study was done in Belgium-they should've just studied people rather than rats. There are plenty of Belgians on EPO! There are some crazy drug experiments racing the Belgian kermesse circuit.

Cessation of intensive treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin is follwed by secondary anemia.

Piron M, Loo M, Gothot A, Tassin F, Fillet G, Beguin Y.

Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, and the Department of Clinical Biology, Division of Laboratory Hematology, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium.

Little information is available on the evolution of erythropoiesis after interruption of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) therapy. Iron-overloaded rats received 20 daily injections of rHuEpo. During treatment, reticulocytes, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and hematocrit increased progressively. This was accompanied by a substantial expansion of spleen erythropoiesis but a decrease in the bone marrow. Five weeks after treatment, rats developed a significant degree of a regenerative anemia. Erythropoietic activity, as assessed by reticulocytes, sTfR, erythroid cellularity, iron incorporation into heme, and the number of erythroid colonies, was severely depressed 3 weeks after cessation of rHuEpo. This was followed by regeneration of erythroblasts and reticulocytes at weeks 6 to 7 post-Epo, but erythroid progenitors recovered only partially by that time. The anemia was definitely corrected 2 months after cessation of rHuEpo treatment. Serum Epo levels remained elevated for several weeks, but the sensitivity of marrow erythroid precursors to Epo was preserved. No rat antibodies to rHuEpo were detected, and serum from post-Epo animals did not exert any inhibitory activity on erythropoiesis. In conclusion, after cessation of intensive rHuEpo therapy, there was a strong inhibition of erythropoietic activity with secondary anemia followed by late recovery. This was not due to antibodies or other soluble inhibitory factors, a defect in endogenous Epo production, or a loss of sensitivity to Epo. This may rather represent intrinsic erythroid marrow exhaustion, mostly at the level of erythroid progenitors but also at later stages of erythropoiesis.

PMID: 11154221 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

FHG

My friend, The Old Man Who Knows, wants to point out that in this study the RATS were given recombinant HUMAN EPO ("rHuEPO")...

Does anybody know, or would you like to guess, what would happen to HUMANS if we would be given recombinant RAT EPO?

I am not surprised at anything that happened to these rats, since they were not given RAT EPO. In any case, The Old Man Who Knows says "don't worry, nothing bad happens when you stop using EPO, except you will not keep your hematocrit up, because of course hematocrit will drop to your "normal" level before you took EPO. That is why I (the Old Man Who Knows) have not stopped using EPO for 4 years."

This post was modified 1 week  ago by Admin

ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2
Share:
  
Working

Please Login or Register