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mac83
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I found this posted on AF by DangerousGroundz thought you guys might be interested: A friend of mine has used and many others this ver product and claim it heals joints permantly in animals and in humans but not yet FDA approved. Anyone use this here is info I found in a quick search on it. If you are searching for a product that treats both the symptoms and the underlying degenerative disease process of horses' joint problems, Adequan ® may be a good choice. First, Adequan has important antiinflammatory effects, so it is able to provide relief from the symptoms of joint damage: heat, swelling, pain and lameness. And Adequan can be found in synovial fluid at full therapeutic levels within only two hours of an intramuscular injection. Also, Adequan is a product with potent ability to block the action of the destructive enzymes that threaten to perpetuate the joint inflammation, attack the cartilage and break down synovial fluid. Second, Adequan also stimulates the synovial membrane to manufacture new, viscous synovial fluid to replace the thin fluid that was produced when the joint became injured. By improving this fluid, Adequan helps the joint regain its ability to lubricate and guard itself against further inflammation, and helps reestablish nutrition to the cartilage. And, Adequan attaches itself to damaged cartilage where it has a positive effect on cartilage metabolism. This should favor the cartilage repair process. Adequan is the only joint treatment proven to reduce the inflammation and pain of degenerative joint disease, but also to help stop the degenerative process while stimulating the production of new joint fluid and new cartilage components. You are no longer just treating symptoms: you're doing something to help stop the degenerative process. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: The recommended dose of Adequan IM in horses is 500mg every 4 days for 28 days intramuscularly. The injection site must be thoroughly cleansed prior to injection. Do not mix Adequan IM with other drugs or solvents. Comes in 500mg/5ml glass vials


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mac83
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FAST ACCESS TO THE JOINTS: Beneficial levels of Adequan are already at work in all major joints within two hours after intramuscular injection, with even greater uptake (up to 73% higher) in joint tissues that are inflamed or diseased. LONG-TERM EFFECTS: Adequan relieves the pain and disability of joint damage, and the relief has been shown to last up to 6 months or longer. BREAKS THE DESTRUCTIVE CYCLE: Adequan binds to damaged cartilage and boosts cartilage metabolism, facilitating repair processes. At the same time, it blocks the action of destructive enzymes that promote joint inflammation, break down the synovial fluid, and attack the cartilage. RENEWS THE JOINT FLUID: Adequan stimulates the synovial membrane to manufacture new synovial fluid to replace the thin, degraded fluid of joint disease. By doing so, Adequan helps lubricate, nourish, and clean the cartilage. First, Adequan has important antiinflammatory effects, so it is able to provide relief from the symptoms of joint damage: heat, swelling, pain and lameness. And Adequan can be found in synovial fluid at full therapeutic levels within only two hours of an intramuscular injection. Also, Adequan is a product with potent ability to block the action of the destructive enzymes that threaten to perpetuate the joint inflammation, attack the cartilage and break down synovial fluid. Second, Adequan also stimulates the synovial membrane to manufacture new, viscous synovial fluid to replace the thin fluid that was produced when the joint became injured. By improving this fluid, Adequan helps the joint regain its ability to lubricate and guard itself against further inflammation, and helps reestablish nutrition to the cartilage. And, Adequan attaches itself to damaged cartilage where it has a positive effect on cartilage metabolism. This should favor the cartilage repair process. Adequan is the only joint treatment proven to reduce the inflammation and pain of degenerative joint disease, but also to help stop the degenerative process while stimulating the production of new joint fluid and new cartilage components. You are no longer just treating symptoms: you're doing something to help stop the degenerative process. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: The recommended dose of Adequan® in horses is 250 mg (1 vial) once a week for five weeks, intra-articularly. The joint area must be shaved, cleansed and sterilized as in a surgical procedure prior to injection. Do not mix Adequan® with other drugs or solvents.


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mac83
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Indications ADEQUAN® Canine is recommended for intramuscular injection for the control of signs associated with non-infectious degenerative and/or traumatic arthritis of canine synovial joints. Pharmacology The active ingredient in ADEQUAN® Canine is polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG). Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan is a semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan prepared by extracting glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) from bovine tracheal cartilage. GAGs are polysaccharides composed of repeating disaccharide units. The GAG present in PSGAG is principally chondroitin sulfate containing 3 to 4 sulfate esters per disaccharide unit. The molecular weight for PSGAG used in the manufacture of ADEQUAN® is 3,000 to 15,000 Daltons. The specific mechanism of action of ADEQUAN® in canine joints is not known. PSGAG is characterized as a "disease modifying osteoarthritis drug". Experiments conducted in vitro have shown PSGAG to inhibit certain catabolic enzymes which have increased activity in inflamed joints, and to enhance the activity of some anabolic enzymes. For example, PSGAG has been shown to significantly inhibit serine proteinases. Serine proteinases have been demonstrated to play a role in the Interleukin-1 mediated degradation of cartilage proteoglycans and collagen. PSGAG is reported to be an inhibitor of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. PGE2 has been shown to increase the loss of proteoglycan from cartilage. PSGAG has been reported to inhibit some catabolic enzymes such as elastase, stromelysin, metalloproteases, cathepsin B1, and hyaluronidases, which degrade collagen, proteoglycans, and Hyaluronic acid in degenerative joint disease. Anabolic effects studied include ability to stimulate the synthesis of protein, collagen, proteoglycans, and Hyaluronic acid in various cells and tissues in vitro. Cultured human and rabbit chondrocytes have shown increased synthesis of proteoglycan and Hyaluronic acid in the presence of PSGAG. PSGAGs have shown a specific potentiating effect on Hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovial membrane cells in vitro. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of PSGAG following intramuscular injection have been studied in several species, including rats, rabbits, humans, horses and dogs. Studies in rabbits showed maximum blood concentrations of PSGAG following IM injection were reached between 20 to 40 minutes following injection, and that the drug was distributed to all tissues studied, including Articular cartilage, synovial fluid, adrenals, thyroid, peritoneal fluid, lungs, eyes, spinal cord, kidneys, brain, liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin, and heart. Following intramuscular injection of PSGAG in humans, the drug was found to be bound to serum proteins. PSGAG binds to both albumin and chi- and beta-globulins and the extent of the binding is suggested to be 30 to 40%. Therefore, the drug may be present in both bound and free form in the bloodstream. Because of its relatively low molecular weight, the synovial membrane is not a significant barrier to distribution of PSGAG from the bloodstream to the synovial fluid. Distribution from the synovial fluid to the cartilage takes place by diffusion. In the Articular cartilage the drug is deposited into the cartilage matrix. Serum and synovial fluid distribution curves of PSGAG have been studied in dogs and appear similar to those found in humans and rabbits. In rabbits, metabolism of PSGAG is reported to take place in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Metabolism may also occur in the kidneys. PSGAG administered intramuscularly and not protein bound or bound to other tissues is excreted primarily via the kidneys, with a small proportion excreted in the feces. Dosage and Administration The recommended dose of ADEQUAN® Canine is 2 mg/lb body weight (.02 mL/lb, or 1 mL per 50 lb), by intramuscular injection only, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks (maximum of 8 injections). Do not exceed the recommended dose or therapeutic regimen. Do not mix ADEQUAN® Canine with other drugs or solvents. Contraindications Do not use in dogs showing hypersensitivity to PSGAG. PSGAG is a synthetic heparinoid; do not use in dogs with known or suspected bleeding disorders. Precautions Store at room temperature 18°-25°C (64°-77°F). Use with caution in dogs with renal or hepatic impairment. Caution Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Warning Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. Side Effects In the clinical efficacy trial, 24 dogs were treated with ADEQUAN® Canine twice weekly for 4 weeks. Possible adverse reactions were reported after 2.1% of the injections. These included transient pain at the injection site (1 incident), transient diarrhea (1 incident each in 2 dogs), and abnormal bleeding (1 incident). These effects were mild and self-limiting and did not require interruption of therapy. To report suspected adverse reactions or for a copy of the Material Safety Data Sheet for this product, contact Luitpold Pharmaceuticals, Inc. at 1-800-458-0163. Toxicology In a subacute toxicity study, 32 adult beagle dogs (4 males and 4 females per treatment group) received either 0.9% saline solution or PSGAG at a dose of 5 mg, 15 mg, or 50 mg per kg of body weight (approximately 2.3, 6.8, or 22.7 mg/lb), via intramuscular injection twice weekly for 13 weeks. PSGAG doses represent approximately 1X, 3X, and 10X the recommended dosage of 2 mg/lb, and more than 3 times the recommended 4-week duration of treatment. Necropsies were performed 24 hours after the final treatment. During week 12, one dog in the 50 mg/kg dosage group developed a large hematoma at the injection site which necessitated euthanasia. No other mortalities occurred during the treatment period. Statistically significant changes in the 50 mg/kg group included increased prothrombin time, reduced platelet count, an increase in ALT and cholesterol, and increased liver and kidney weights. Increased cholesterol and kidney weights were also noted in the 15 mg/kg group. Microscopic lesions were noted in the liver (Kupffer cells containing eosinophilic foamy cytoplasm), kidneys (swollen, foamy cells in the proximal convoluted tubules), and lymph nodes (macrophages with eosinophilic foamy cytoplasm) in the 15 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg groups. Intramuscular inflammation, hemorrhage, and degeneration were seen in all 3 PSGAG treated groups; the incidence and severity appeared dose related. Trial Data Efficacy of ADEQUAN® Canine was demonstrated in two studies. A laboratory study using radio labeled PSGAG established distribution of PSGAG into canine serum and synovial fluid following a single intramuscular injection of 2 mg/lb. A clinical field trial was conducted in dogs diagnosed with radio graphically-confirmed traumatic and/or degenerative joint disease of 1 or 2 joints. Joints evaluated included hips, stifles, shoulders, hocks and elbows. Fifty-one dogs were randomly assigned to receive either ADEQUAN® Canine at 2 mg/lb of body weight or 0.9% saline. Both treatments were administered by intramuscular injection twice weekly for 4 weeks (8 injections total). Investigators administering treatment and evaluating the dogs were unaware of the treatment assignment. A total of 71 limbs in 51 dogs were evaluated. Of these, 35 limbs in 24 dogs were in the ADEQUAN® Canine treated group. Each lame limb was scored for lameness at a walk, lameness at a trot, pain, range of motion, and functional disability. The scores for the individual parameters were combined to determine a total orthopedic score. At the end of the treatment period, dogs treated with ADEQUAN® Canine showed a statistically significant improvement in range of motion and total orthopedic score over placebo treated control dogs. Studies to establish the safety of ADEQUAN® Canine in breeding, pregnant, or lactating dogs have not been conducted. Presentation ADEQUAN® Canine Solution 100 mg/mL in a 5 mL preserved multiple dose vial


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Troponin
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I've heard of this, supposedly pretty good.


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biggreene
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find it in mex. mabye??? sounds good.


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geezer.a.s
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Where is this available from? Do you have to order from a veterinary supply house? If you know where to get it please pm me


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mac83
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yup do a google search, you'll find some place to obtain it.


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ezstreet
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that sounds like the greatest new I've read since I found out I have deteriorated joint damage 10 years ago. Gotta get it gotta try it. I have no doubt from what I've read here and through the google searches it works. I just get a little worried about sides in humans . I hate to be the first to get questioned in hell about how I just landed there...i.e. Burning screaming dude yells in pain: "How the fuck did you land your ass in hell so quick?" "Fucking Adequan!.....I knew I Should've waited for some human studies or some other human lab rats before I jumped the gun!!!!!!!"


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ezstreet
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another thing besides the death issue(not likely but who knows what drugs in may be contraindicated for) is making cartilidge grow in unwanted places such as the nose. No big deal if a horse's faces gets a little longer or a dogs nose gets bigger but it wouldn't take much to alter a human's facial structure to drastically changes ones looks. Again it doesn't sound like there is a huge probability. It does indicate all the pathways affected and that could possibly be one of them. I just can't understand why something of this magnitude of potential not being focused on humans with arthitis ravaging the human population? Unless all these anit-inflamitory NSAIDS pharmacueticals would lose billions for something that illiminates pain while actuaually repairing damaged tissue. The quality of life of millions could improve almost overnight and no longer be a major issue in the aging populace(as well as athletes). The main reason I even fuck with GH is because of joint issues. The main thing that keeps me outta the gym is joint issues. In fact it's the main thing you'll hear godamn near every athlete you'll ever speak eventually succumbing to joint/cartilidge breakdown/damage. Thanks mac! Ive had my damn credit card in front of me for about 30 minutes now. Hey massG - it's irate1/sm from varix....I'll buy you a bottle if you guinea pig it out for me?????:) seriously......


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mac83
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hahah you're welcome bro, as far as i've read a few guys have tried it with tremendous success and i've heard of no bad sides.


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bigntasty20
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just use some deca jeez lol


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mac83
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well the thing is that deca only provides temporary relief (basically it only helps while you're running it) this supposedly will help permanently heal the problem


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ezstreet
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Well I ordered it from a place. The place didn't mention too much about a script from the vet supply. But in my receipt email it said, "If you ordered prescription meds, they will be sent a soon as the prescription is recieved from the doctor." That's fucked! any ideas????????????? My fucking shoulder is keeping outta the gym....there will be no doc sending a fucking script! CC # & info already taken. Maybe they'll fuck up! pm or wtf ever with if anyones hip to a hassle free way. I know it can't be that hard and don't think there would be a customs issue...I guess an os pharm(may have just answered my own question).


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mac83
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i don't think a scrip is needed.


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ezstreet
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Originally posted by mac83 i don't think a scrip is needed. Those of you who are suffering the dreadful burning - worse than burning - in the joints produced by lyme arthritis, can find nearly total pain relief. This relief comes with the use of a drug licensed for humans in Europe as 'Arteparon' and used in the US (for dogs and horses) as 'Adequan'*. The lesion of lyme arthritis is erosion of the cartilage in joints. Cartilage erosions are exquisitely painful. The Arteparon or Adequan is, chemically, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, or 'PSGAG'. It is administered intramuscularly, and goes directly to the joints where it begins to fill in and to heal the erosions, thereby ending the pain and inflammation, and reducing the resultant long-term arthritic changes. It is totally unlike any other drug used to control pain in joints, and has virtually no negative side whatsoever. In normal injury situations, a course of therapy of twice weekly injections for five weeks usually suffices to allow the synovial lining of the joint to recover (in the absence of inflammation) and resume its usual task of producing these compounds for repair. In lyme, where the insult to the cartilage is ongoing, therapy must be continued until the antibiotics have controlled the spirochetes to the point that they no longer create the erosions.Those of you who are suffering the dreadful burning - worse than burning - in the joints produced by lyme arthritis, can find nearly total pain relief. This relief comes with the use of a drug licensed for humans in Europe as 'Arteparon' and used in the US (for dogs and horses) as 'Adequan'*. The lesion of lyme arthritis is erosion of the cartilage in joints. Cartilage erosions are exquisitely painful. The Arteparon or Adequan is, chemically, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, or 'PSGAG'. It is administered intramuscularly, and goes directly to the joints where it begins to fill in and to heal the erosions, thereby ending the pain and inflammation, and reducing the resultant long-term arthritic changes. It is totally unlike any other drug used to control pain in joints, and has virtually no negative side whatsoever. In normal injury situations, a course of therapy of twice weekly injections for five weeks usually suffices to allow the synovial lining of the joint to recover (in the absence of inflammation) and resume its usual task of producing these compounds for repair. In lyme, where the insult to the cartilage is ongoing, therapy must be continued until the antibiotics have controlled the spirochetes to the point that they no longer create the erosions. A note on the availability of Arteparon/Adequan. When asked why this drug isn't available in the US, 2 orthopedists replied that there just wasn't enough money to be made.


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