Estrogen and aggression  

  RSS

headdoc
(@headdoc)
Trusted Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 86
01/05/2019 5:26 pm  

University of Wisconsin-Madisonws
Gender hormones may lend to social disorder therapies
August 24, 2005
Gender politics aside, every biologist knows that men and women truly are different.
Social disorders such as autism constitute one area where those differences come to the fore: around 80 percent of all autism cases, for example, occur in men. Social play behaviors also differ greatly between the sexes—just about everyone agrees that young boys play "rougher" than girls.
Early in human development, critical brain proteins known as steroid receptors lay most of the groundwork for ensuing sexual destinies. The receptors bind to hormones such as Testosterone and estrogen and set in motion gender blueprints for a lifetime.
To understand why autistic children have trouble engaging in social interactions, researchers have long observed "rough-and-tumble" play—the propensity to bite, wrestle or pounce—in juvenile rats. Scientists were convinced that testosterone solely dictated the onset of such behavior.
But researchers at UW-Madison have now made the surprising finding that estrogen-and even dopamine, a neurotransmitter-also play critical roles. The work, which appeared online Aug. 16 in the journal Endocrinology, may one day help diagnose new autism cases and potentially pave the way for new hormone-based therapeutic approaches that counteract the social difficulties of autism, says senior author Anthony Auger, an assistant professor of psychology.
"Our work points out an overlooked mechanism that controls social play behavior," says Auger. "Now if we work to understand how these biological mechanisms control social behavior, we can discern which points of the various pathways are involved in the disruption of social interactions."
Male rats are likely to engage in rough-and-tumble play almost 13 times as frequently as females, says Auger. But when the UW-Madison team treated newborn females with estrogen, they bit, boxed, pinned and pounced as frequently as the males after reaching juvenile age. The estrogen effectively "masculinized" the females, Auger says.
To the scientists' surprise, a similar result took place when they treated the females with a mimic of the neurotransmitter dopamine, a chemical messenger in the brain that regulates emotions and feelings of pleasure.
The UW-Madison study results imply that many factors, beyond steroid receptors and sex hormones, may be interrupted during the onset of social disorders, Auger says. Consequently, he hopes to focus on the potential role of another group of proteins - known as growth factors - in social play behaviors.
Other scientists who participated in the study include UW-Madison doctoral student and lead author Kristin Olesen, zoologist Catherine Auger and research specialist Heather Jessen.

And we'll collect the moments one by one. I guess that's how the future's done. Feist, "Mushaboom", 2005


Quote
pSimonkey
(@psimonkey)
Trusted Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 70
01/05/2019 6:11 pm  

wow thats abit of interesting turn. I have often noticed the dopamine relationship in autism but/and it seems to be rather more friendly than psychosis, which is far more dopamine apparent in behaviour, in as muchas it, autism, appears less deconstructive and more comfortably boxed in until such time as the walls of the box are realised and then, boom, dopamine dynamic. Frustration and very focused, determined confrontation. What do you think headdoc?


ReplyQuote
headdoc
(@headdoc)
Trusted Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 86
01/05/2019 6:59 pm  

I posted this because I was stunned by it. The dopamine imbalance is not so much of a surprise. I have alsways looked at autism and its spectrum as more related to structural deficits in the brain and less related to neurotransmitters. The endocrinological relationship in general and estrogen specifically is news. I never paid attention to the fact the Asberger cases I worked with over the past sevral years have had the appearance of some hypogonadism. Actually one of the cases was sent to me by his primary care doc and psychiatrist after his hormones were evaluated. That was a few years ago. I'll now have to go back and see what tests were run. He was pronounced normal for an adolescent boy. From what I've read on the HRT forums, I'd be willing to be total T and nothing else was tested. Given this lad's hypersensitiivty to negative affect, his corticoadrenal hormones would be worth checking also.

And we'll collect the moments one by one. I guess that's how the future's done. Feist, "Mushaboom", 2005


ReplyQuote
Myke
 Myke
(@myke)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 18
01/05/2019 7:40 pm  

very informative learnings..headdoc is it true that stimulants causes anxiety and depression also in sexual disorders?


ReplyQuote
Myke
 Myke
(@myke)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 18
01/05/2019 8:18 pm  

i like this site..i can learn many things from real people..thanks


ReplyQuote
Share:
  
Working

Please Login or Register