Pain in my butt-for three years  

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Dilybo
(@dilybo)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 5
10/05/2019 8:03 am  

I haven't posted here in years but I hope someone can help. When I stopped lifting weights I got a pain in the left side of my butt and down through my left knee that has been a constant thing ever since. I went to an orthopedic surgeon for the knee pain and was told there was nothing wrong with it. Things kept getting worse so I finally went to a chiropractor. He told me I have minor scoliosis and my pelvis is tilted forward. On top of all this the base of my spine is crunched together and my sciatic nerve is being pinched. The chiropractor did help and the pain got to a bearable level each day. I thought exercising again would strengthen the muscles and everything would get better. Instead I realized I can't jog, I can't get on the elliptical machine and I'm scared to death to try anything else. If anyone has been through something like this or if you have any adive I would love to hear it. I want to start working out again but I'm scared to. Hubby is back in the gym and I want to go too.


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gaskibba
(@gaskibba)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 2
10/05/2019 8:55 am  

Make sure your hamstrings and glute's are stretched really well. Also that all aspects of the Glute's are isometrically worked. Just looking at them both right and left usually will give some indication if that's a part of your problem. Also check for pronation and use some orthotic inserts if you do.
Take care
Gerard


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guijr
(@guijr)
Honorable Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 502
10/05/2019 9:32 am  

Maybe you should talk to a Neurologist.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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Dilybo
(@dilybo)
Active Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 5
10/05/2019 10:13 am  

I think the Neurologists is my next option becuse the pain that I'm having now is a constant burning pain in my left hip.


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guijr
(@guijr)
Honorable Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 502
10/05/2019 10:59 am  

Please, do it now.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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smellycatt
(@smellycatt)
Active Member
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 19
10/05/2019 11:42 am  

Re: Hanstrings and Glute's

Posted by: gaskibba
Make sure your hamstrings and glute's are stretched really well. Also that all aspects of the Glute's are isometrically worked. Just looking at them both right and left usually will give some indication if that's a part of your problem. Also check for pronation and use some orthotic inserts if you do.
Take care
Gerard

I do with gaskibba here. Stretching several times a day will help. I have some very bad disks in my lower back. I went to the chiropractor (whom I have lifted with) and he helped me a lot. Mostly with teaching me to stretch correctly and getting me to incorporate it into my daily life. Not when I remember or when it hurts but everyday. Once in the am before the gym and once before bed.

Worked wonders to change things. Before that I had pains in my legs for 2 years.


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Dilybo
(@dilybo)
Active Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 5
11/05/2019 6:19 pm  

I want to thank you guys for all the help. I have exercises the chiropractor gave me. I'm going to make myself do them. Because I am a teacher's assistent I'm going to have to wait till summer to have anything done about this. I think I have decide to go on and have what ever surgery will fix this. I am so sick of this pain everyday.


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jboldman
(@jboldman)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 687
11/05/2019 7:04 pm  

we are rooting for you. keep us posted on your progress(we hope).

jb


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Bilter
(@bilter)
Trusted Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 71
11/05/2019 7:58 pm  

I suffered from back pain for years. I saw chiropractors, orthapedists (sp?) etc. I had a compression of the disk between L4 /L5. They were able to ease the pain some but what really helped me was when I made the decision to strengthen the stableizing muscles in my spine / torso. Lots of crunches and started sqauting WITHOUT a belt. Lowered my weight a lot but after a year my back felt better than it had in 8 years. I will say also if I miss a couple of weeks of squatting my back starts to feel worse. I do think you should see a neurologist to make sure it nothig too serious. But keep your chin up, there are things you can do to help. Good luck!


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Dilybo
(@dilybo)
Active Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 5
11/05/2019 8:43 pm  

I don't know if you guys are religious but I have a major league praise report. My husband bought me an elliptical machine. I'm not sure what's different about it but I CAN DO IT. I have had less pain in my back and my usually weak knees are becoming stronger again. YEH!!!!!! I am being very careful but man it sure does feel good to be able to exercise again.


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53x12
(@53x12)
Active Member
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 15
11/05/2019 9:15 pm  

L5/S1

don't know how old this is but this is quick reply to..."the butt" pain.

i went through and still deal w/ "butt"/left glute pain.
after zillions of traditional and alternative therapies the MRI says L5/S1 disc buldge on the nerve root.
i've done EVERTHING except surgery....better but come and goes.
oh...the only thing i can think of that i did'nt try was acupuncture.
did everthing from cortisone shots to osteopathic manipualtion to rolfing. oh yea not to mention relentless CORE and back work and stretching and yoga......

whatever it takes !!


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Dilybo
(@dilybo)
Active Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 5
12/05/2019 9:04 am  

I finally had it out with my general practice doctor and demanded an MRI. What I thought was siatica is really arthritis in the immovable joints of my lower back. I probably made this worse by squatting more than I should have trying to build a bigger butt. I've now been told that I shouldn't lift any heavy weight and lifting anything over hip level is out of the question. The pain came from inflammation to the joints and constant muscle cramps. I take an anti-inflamatory every day now and muscle relaxers when I need it. I walk a lot and stretch my butt muscles to keep the cramping down. It still hurts all the time but no where near as bad. I would still love to get back in a gym.


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guijr
(@guijr)
Honorable Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 502
12/05/2019 9:57 am  

Re: L5/S1

Posted by: 53x12
L5/S1

don't know how old this is but this is quick reply to..."the butt" pain.

i went through and still deal w/ "butt"/left glute pain.
after zillions of traditional and alternative therapies the MRI says L5/S1 disc buldge on the nerve root.
i've done EVERTHING except surgery....better but come and goes.
oh...the only thing i can think of that i did'nt try was acupuncture.
did everthing from cortisone shots to osteopathic manipualtion to rolfing. oh yea not to mention relentless CORE and back work and stretching and yoga......

I really don't what's going on with you, but sometimes the piriform muscle gets hypertrofied leading to severe pain. I friend of mine used to ride a lot in his bike and got this very injury. Below some food for thought:

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Rossi P, Cardinali P, Serrao M, Parisi L, Bianco F, De Bac S. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in piriformis syndrome: a case report. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001;82(4):519-21.

ABSTRACT

Piriformis syndrome (PS) is an unusual cause of sciatica that, because of the lack of strict diagnostic criteria, remains a controversial clinical entity. The diagnosis of PS is still primarily clinical because no diagnostic tests have proven to be definitive. We report the case of a 30-year-old woman, affected by a severe scoliosis, who developed a persistent buttock pain resembling that of PS. The clinical suspicion was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvis, which showed an enlargement of the left piriformis muscle with an anterior isplacement of the sciatic nerve. The role of MRI in the diagnosis, clinical definition, and therapeutic approach to PS is discussed.

============================

Chen WS, Wan YL. Sciatica caused by piriformis muscle syndrome: report of two cases. J Formos Med Assoc. 1992;91(6):647-50.

ABSTRACT

The diagnosis of piriformis muscle syndrome, an unusual cause of sciatica, is difficult. However, with the advancement of imaging techniques, it has become clear that the condition is not just clinical speculation, but is a definite entity. We report on two cases with piriformis muscle syndrome, diagnosed on the basis of: a history of sciatica; physical findings, such as a tender point at the sciatic notch and around the piriformis muscle by palpation of the gluteal region, and by a digital pelvic examination; and computed tomography (CT) to demonstrate hypertrophy of the piriformis muscle. In both cases, a tenotomy of the piriformis muscle at the greater trochanter relieved entrapment of the sciatic nerve and gave satisfactory results. Since local tenderness at the piriformis muscle is the most reliable physical finding, a pelvic examination is recommended in the evaluation of suspected cases of piriformis muscle syndrome. CT is helpful in showing hypertrophy of the piriformis muscle. Detailed history taking, a careful physical examination, and versatile use of CT or magnetic resonance imaging can lead to an early, accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.

============================

Filler AG, Haynes J, Jordan SE, Prager J, Villablanca JP, Farahani K, McBride DQ, Tsuruda JS, Morisoli B, Batzdorf U, Johnson JP. Sciatica of nondisc origin and piriformis syndrome: diagnosis by magnetic resonance neurography and interventional magnetic resonance imaging with outcome study of resulting treatment. 1: J Neurosurg Spine. 2005;2(2):99-115.

ABSTRACT

OBJECT: Because lumbar magnetic resonance (MR) imaging fails to identify a treatable cause of chronic sciatica in nearly 1 million patients annually, the authors conducted MR neurography and interventional MR imaging in 239 consecutive patients with sciatica in whom standard diagnosis and treatment failed to effect improvement. METHODS: After performing MR neurography and interventional MR imaging, the final rediagnoses included the following: piriformis syndrome (67.8%), distal foraminal nerve root entrapment (6%), ischial tunnel syndrome (4.7%), discogenic pain with referred leg pain (3.4%), pudendal nerve entrapment with referred pain (3%), distal sciatic entrapment (2.1%), sciatic tumor (1.7%), lumbosacral plexus entrapment (1.3%), unappreciated lateral disc herniation (1.3%), nerve root injury due to spinal surgery (1.3%), inadequate spinal nerve root decompression (0.8%), lumbar stenosis (0.8%), sacroiliac joint inflammation (0.8%), lumbosacral plexus tumor (0.4%), sacral fracture (0.4%), and no diagnosis (4.2%). Open MR-guided Marcaine injection into the piriformis muscle produced the following results: no response (15.7%), relief of greater than 8 months (14.9%), relief lasting 2 to 4 months with continuing relief after second injection (7.5%), relief for 2 to 4 months with subsequent recurrence (36.6%), and relief for 1 to 14 days with full recurrence (25.4%). Piriformis surgery (62 operations; 3-cm incision, transgluteal approach, 55% outpatient; 40% with local or epidural anesthesia) resulted in excellent outcome in 58.5%, good outcome in 22.6%, limited benefit in 13.2%, no benefit in 3.8%, and worsened symptoms in 1.9%. CONCLUSIONS: This Class A quality evaluation of MR neurography's diagnostic efficacy revealed that piriformis muscle asymmetry and sciatic nerve hyperintensity at the sciatic notch exhibited a 93% specificity and 64% sensitivity in distinguishing patients with piriformis syndrome from those without who had similar symptoms (p < 0.01). Evaluation of the nerve beyond the proximal foramen provided eight additional diagnostic categories affecting 96% of these patients. More than 80% of the population good or excellent functional outcome was achieved.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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