Are Egg Whites High In Chol  

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BlackPoppaPump
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23/06/2018 6:20 pm  

jus want to know because i been been boiling them and taking out the yolk


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Wheelies
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23/06/2018 7:13 pm  

No. Only the yolks are high in cholesterol. W.


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BlackPoppaPump
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23/06/2018 7:49 pm  

ok thanks alot because i have high chol and dont want it to get higher


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liftsiron
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23/06/2018 8:33 pm  

Actually egg yolks on average only contain approx 100mgs of cholesterol. The yolk is also very high in lecithin a natural cholesterol emulsifier. I read a few studies where test subjects were fed up to 36 whole eggs to day to see effects on cholesterol in something like 80-85% of test subjects, cholesterol. actually dropped. Although the egg yolk is high in calories so I normally eat only two whole eggs along with 6-8 whites.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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guijr
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23/06/2018 9:10 pm  

Since up to one-third of the population may be hyperresponders, knowing the response of an individual is important before making the egg a regular item of the diet. IMO it's a good idea to limit: (i) yolk intake, (ii) the degree of heat applied and (iii) the usage of oil and butter for preparation of its fried and delicious version . ============================== Kritchevsky SB. A review of scientific research and recommendations regarding eggs. J Am Coll Nutr. 2004;23(6 Suppl):596S-600S. ABSTRACT For much of the past 40 years, the public has been warned away from eggs because of a concern over coronary heart disease risk. This concern is based on three observations: 1. eggs are a rich source of dietary cholesterol; 2. when fed experimentally, dietary cholesterol increases serum cholesterol and; 3. high serum cholesterol predicts the onset of coronary heart disease. However, data from free-living populations show that egg consumption is not associated with higher cholesterol levels. Furthermore, as a whole, the epidemiologic literature does not support the idea that egg consumption is a risk factor for coronary disease. Within the nutritional community there is a growing appreciation that health derives from an overall pattern of diet rather than from the avoidance of particular foods, and there has been a shift in the tone in recent dietary recommendations away from "avoidance" messages to ones that promote healthy eating patterns. The most recent American Heart Association guidelines no longer include a recommendation to limit egg consumption, but recommend the adoption of eating practices associated with good health. Based on the epidemiologic evidence, there is no reason to think that such a healthy eating pattern could not include eggs. ============================== Scharer M, Schulthess G. Egg intake and cardiovascular risk. Ther Umsch. 2005;62(9):611-3. ABSTRACT Egg yolk has the highest content of cholesterol observed in different types of food. Intake of one egg per day increases the serum concentration of LDL cholesterol by 0.10 mmol/l. In healthy people eating a Western diet, egg consumption does not correlate with cardiovascular risk. However, a significant increase of the risk was observed in diabetic subjects starting from an intake of 5-7 eggs per week. However, dietary pattern rather than a single component of nutrition influences cardiovascular risk. The egg - rich in proteins, unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins and minerals - should be part of our nutrition, and it is not justified to recommend a general limitation of egg intake. However, we do not advice unbalanced high egg consumption. A cardioprotective diet is characterized by high variability and contains plenty of fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates. ============================== Fernandez ML. Dietary cholesterol provided by eggs and plasma lipoproteins in healthy populations. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2006;9(1):8-12. ABSTRACT PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Extensive research has not clearly established a link between egg consumption and risk for coronary heart disease. The effects of egg intake on plasma lipids and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) atherogenicity in healthy populations need to be addressed. RECENT FINDINGS: The lack of connection between heart disease and egg intake could partially be explained by the fact that dietary cholesterol increases the concentrations of both circulating LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in those individuals who experience an increase in plasma cholesterol following egg consumption (hyperresponders). It is also important to note that 70% of the population experiences a mild increase or no alterations in plasma cholesterol concentrations when challenged with high amounts of dietary cholesterol (hyporesponders). Egg intake has been shown to promote the formation of large LDL, in addition to shifting individuals from the LDL pattern B to pattern A, which is less atherogenic. Eggs are also good sources of antioxidants known to protect the eye; therefore, increased plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin in individuals consuming eggs are also of interest, especially in those populations susceptible to developing macular degeneration and eye cataracts. SUMMARY: For these reasons, dietary recommendations aimed at restricting egg consumption should not be generalized to include all individuals. We need to acknowledge that diverse healthy populations experience no risk in developing coronary heart disease by increasing their intake of cholesterol but, in contrast, they may have multiple beneficial effects by the inclusion of eggs in their regular diet. ============================== Constant J. The role of eggs, margarines and fish oils in the nutritional management of coronary artery disease and strokes. Keio J Med. 2004;53(3):131-6. ABSTRACT Although egg yolk is a rich source of cholesterol, the effect of eggs in raising serum cholesterol is variable and in some subjects there is no effect whatsoever. However, oxidized cholesterol can increase atherosclerosis even with normal serum cholesterol. In order to attenuate oxidation of cholesterol in eggs, it is necessary to limit the degree of heat applied. This means that we should use only soft-boiled eggs which should be almost like water. We can also avoid egg yolk altogether and get a highly nutritious egg food from the egg white alone. The saturated fats from milk products, especially butter, are highly atherogenic. There are available many butter substitutes in the form of margarines. But many of these margarines have hydrogenated vegetable oils which result in the production of trans-fatty acids. The trans-fatty acids are as atherogenic as saturated fats. There are available, however, margarines without the trans-fatty acids. These are found only in large supermarkets. Fish oils contain N3 fatty-acids which, unlike vegetable oils which contain N6 fatty-acids, can prevent atherosclerosis and sudden death by counteracting ventricular arrhythmias, acting as antioxidants, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory agents, and decreasing triglycerides and blood pressure.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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guijr
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23/06/2018 10:04 pm  

But, we have to show the other side of the coin as well and IMO that's what science is all about. ============================== Nakamura Y, Okamura T, Tamaki S, Kadowaki T, Hayakawa T, Kita Y, Okayama A, Ueshima H; NIPPON DATA80 Research Group. Egg consumption, serum cholesterol, and cause-specific and all-cause mortality: the National Integrated Project for Prospective Observation of Non-communicable Disease and Its Trends in the Aged, 1980 (NIPPON DATA80). Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80(1):58-63. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Because egg yolk has a high cholesterol concentration, limited egg consumption is often suggested to help prevent ischemic heart disease (IHD). OBJECTIVE: We epidemiologically examined the validity of this recommendation. DESIGN: We analyzed the relations of egg consumption to serum cholesterol and cause-specific and all-cause mortality by using the NIPPON DATA80 (National Integrated Project for Prospective Observation of Non-communicable Disease And its Trends in the Aged, 1980) database. At the baseline examination in 1980, a nutritional survey was performed by using the food-frequency method in Japanese subjects aged > or =30 y. We followed 5186 women and 4077 men for 14 y. RESULTS: The subjects were categorized into 5 egg consumption groups on the basis of their responses to a questionnaire (> or =2/d, 1/d, 1/2 d, 1-2/wk, and seldom). There were 69, 1396, 1667, 1742, and 315 women in each of the 5 groups, respectively. Age-adjusted total cholesterol (5.21, 5.04, 4.95, 4.91, and 4.92 mmol/L in the 5 egg consumption categories, respectively) was related to egg consumption (P < 0.0001, analysis of covariance). In women, unadjusted IHD mortality and all-cause mortality differed significantly between the groups [IHD mortality: 1.1, 0.5, 0.4, 0.5, and 2.0 per 1000 person-years, respectively (P = 0.008, chi-square test); all-cause mortality: 14.8, 8.0, 7.5, 7.5, and 14.5 per 1000 person-years, respectively (P < 0.0001, chi-square test)]. In men, egg consumption was not related to age-adjusted total cholesterol. Cox analysis found that, in women, all-cause mortality in the 1-2-eggs/wk group was significantly lower than that in the 1-egg/d group, whereas no such relations were noted in men. CONCLUSION: Limiting egg consumption may have some health benefits, at least in women in geographic areas where egg consumption makes a relatively large contribution to total dietary cholesterol intake. ============================== Greene CM, Zern TL, Wood RJ, Shrestha S, Aggarwal D, Sharman MJ, Volek JS, Fernandez ML. Maintenance of the LDL Cholesterol:HDL Cholesterol Ratio in an Elderly Population Given a Dietary Cholesterol Challenge. J Nutr. 2005;135(12):2793-8. ABSTRACT We previously evaluated the responses to dietary cholesterol in children and young adults. In this study, the effects of dietary cholesterol on plasma lipids and LDL atherogenicity were evaluated in 42 elderly subjects (29 postmenopausal women and 13 men > 60 y old). Our exclusion criteria were diabetes, heart disease, and the use of reductase inhibitors. The study followed a randomized crossover design in which subjects were assigned to consume the equivalent of 3 large eggs (EGG) daily or the same amount of a cholesterol-free, fat-free egg substitute (SUB) for a 1-mo period. After a 3-wk washout period, subjects were assigned to the alternate treatment. The concentration of plasma cholesterol after the EGG period varied among subjects. When all subjects were evaluated, there were significant increases in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) (P < 0.05) and HDL-C (P < 0.001) for both men and women during the EGG period, resulting in no alterations in the LDL-C:HDL-C or the total cholesterol:HDL-C ratios. In addition, the LDL peak diameter was increased during the EGG period for all subjects. In contrast, the measured parameters of LDL oxidation, conjugated diene formation, and LDL lag time did not differ between the EGG and the SUB periods. We conclude from this study that dietary cholesterol provided by eggs does not increase the risk for heart disease in a healthy elderly population. ============================== Chakrabarty G, Manjunatha S, Bijlani RL, Ray RB, Mahapatra SC, Mehta N, Lakshmy R, Vashisht S, Manchanda SC. The effect of ingestion of egg on the serum lipid profile of healthy young Indians. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2004;48(3):286-92. ABSTRACT Thirty four healthy young volunteers (22 men, 12 women; age 25.7 +/- 5.8 years; BMI 20.8 +/- 2.3 kg/m2) participated in a randomized controlled cross-over trial on the effect of consuming one boiled egg every day for 8 wk on the serum lipid profile. The only significant change after 8 wk of egg consumption was an elevation of the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio. However, scrutiny of individual responses revealed that twelve of the subjects (10 men, 2 women) had a greater than 15% rise in the LDL cholesterol level after 8 wk of egg consumption. These subjects, considered hyperresponders, showed significant increases (P < 0.025) at both 4 wk and 8 wk after egg consumption in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, and at 8 wk in total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio. The remaining 22 hyporesponders showed no change in any of the variables measured at 4 wk or 8 wk after egg consumption. In view of the high nutritional value of eggs, a blanket ban on eggs is not justified. However, since up to one-third of the population may be hyperresponders, knowing the response of an individual is important before making the egg a regular item of the diet.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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BlackPoppaPump
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23/06/2018 11:05 pm  

arent we talking about egg whites

Posted by: guijr
Since up to one-third of the population may be hyperresponders, knowing the response of an individual is important before making the egg a regular item of the diet. IMO it's a good idea to limit: (i) yolk intake, (ii) the degree of heat applied and (iii) the usage of oil and butter for preparation of its fried and delicious version . ============================== Kritchevsky SB. A review of scientific research and recommendations regarding eggs. J Am Coll Nutr. 2004;23(6 Suppl):596S-600S. ABSTRACT For much of the past 40 years, the public has been warned away from eggs because of a concern over coronary heart disease risk. This concern is based on three observations: 1. eggs are a rich source of dietary cholesterol; 2. when fed experimentally, dietary cholesterol increases serum cholesterol and; 3. high serum cholesterol predicts the onset of coronary heart disease. However, data from free-living populations show that egg consumption is not associated with higher cholesterol levels. Furthermore, as a whole, the epidemiologic literature does not support the idea that egg consumption is a risk factor for coronary disease. Within the nutritional community there is a growing appreciation that health derives from an overall pattern of diet rather than from the avoidance of particular foods, and there has been a shift in the tone in recent dietary recommendations away from "avoidance" messages to ones that promote healthy eating patterns. The most recent American Heart Association guidelines no longer include a recommendation to limit egg consumption, but recommend the adoption of eating practices associated with good health. Based on the epidemiologic evidence, there is no reason to think that such a healthy eating pattern could not include eggs. ============================== Scharer M, Schulthess G. Egg intake and cardiovascular risk. Ther Umsch. 2005 Sep;62(9):611-3. ABSTRACT Egg yolk has the highest content of cholesterol observed in different types of food. Intake of one egg per day increases the serum concentration of LDL cholesterol by 0.10 mmol/l. In healthy people eating a Western diet, egg consumption does not correlate with cardiovascular risk. However, a significant increase of the risk was observed in diabetic subjects starting from an intake of 5-7 eggs per week. However, dietary pattern rather than a single component of nutrition influences cardiovascular risk. The egg - rich in proteins, unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins and minerals - should be part of our nutrition, and it is not justified to recommend a general limitation of egg intake. However, we do not advice unbalanced high egg consumption. A cardioprotective diet is characterized by high variability and contains plenty of fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates. ============================== Fernandez ML. Dietary cholesterol provided by eggs and plasma lipoproteins in healthy populations. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2006;9(1):8-12. ABSTRACT PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Extensive research has not clearly established a link between egg consumption and risk for coronary heart disease. The effects of egg intake on plasma lipids and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) atherogenicity in healthy populations need to be addressed. RECENT FINDINGS: The lack of connection between heart disease and egg intake could partially be explained by the fact that dietary cholesterol increases the concentrations of both circulating LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in those individuals who experience an increase in plasma cholesterol following egg consumption (hyperresponders). It is also important to note that 70% of the population experiences a mild increase or no alterations in plasma cholesterol concentrations when challenged with high amounts of dietary cholesterol (hyporesponders). Egg intake has been shown to promote the formation of large LDL, in addition to shifting individuals from the LDL pattern B to pattern A, which is less atherogenic. Eggs are also good sources of antioxidants known to protect the eye; therefore, increased plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin in individuals consuming eggs are also of interest, especially in those populations susceptible to developing macular degeneration and eye cataracts. SUMMARY: For these reasons, dietary recommendations aimed at restricting egg consumption should not be generalized to include all individuals. We need to acknowledge that diverse healthy populations experience no risk in developing coronary heart disease by increasing their intake of cholesterol but, in contrast, they may have multiple beneficial effects by the inclusion of eggs in their regular diet. ============================== Constant J. The role of eggs, margarines and fish oils in the nutritional management of coronary artery disease and strokes. Keio J Med. 2004;53(3):131-6. ABSTRACT Although egg yolk is a rich source of cholesterol, the effect of eggs in raising serum cholesterol is variable and in some subjects there is no effect whatsoever. However, oxidized cholesterol can increase atherosclerosis even with normal serum cholesterol. In order to attenuate oxidation of cholesterol in eggs, it is necessary to limit the degree of heat applied. This means that we should use only soft-boiled eggs which should be almost like water. We can also avoid egg yolk altogether and get a highly nutritious egg food from the egg white alone. The saturated fats from milk products, especially butter, are highly atherogenic. There are available many butter substitutes in the form of margarines. But many of these margarines have hydrogenated vegetable oils which result in the production of trans-fatty acids. The trans-fatty acids are as atherogenic as saturated fats. There are available, however, margarines without the trans-fatty acids. These are found only in large supermarkets. Fish oils contain N3 fatty-acids which, unlike vegetable oils which contain N6 fatty-acids, can prevent atherosclerosis and sudden death by counteracting ventricular arrhythmias, acting as antioxidants, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory agents, and decreasing triglycerides and blood pressure.

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guijr
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23/06/2018 11:49 pm  

I think we're talking not only about egg whites. People like Liftsiron, me, my father, I mean ordinary people that we live with consume whole eggs as well. So why not try to dismitify things a little bit .

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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guijr
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24/06/2018 12:49 am  

This one if for those who are egg whites eaters . ============================== Asato L, Wang MF, Chan YC, Yeh SH, Chung HM, Chung SY, Chida S, Uezato T, Suzuki I, Yamagata N, Kokubu T, Yamamoto S. Effect of egg white on serum cholesterol concentration in young women. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 1996;42(2):87-96. ABSTRACT In a previous study we observed favorable effects of egg white on serum lipids in rats and mice. The present study was designed to elucidate these effects in 24 female university students with moderate hypercholesterolemia. About 30% of total protein was supplied with egg white, tofu or cheese. The experiment was conducted for a complete menstruation cycle of each subject. Lipid intake was about 30% of total energy intake. The energy intake of each subject was constant throughout the experiment. Body weight was measured every morning. Daily activity was measured by a pedometer. Blood was withdrawn after an overnight fast on the first, 15th and last days and serum lipids were measured. Body weight was measured every morning. Daily activity was measured by a pedometer. Blood was withdrawn after an overnight fast on the first, 15th and last days and serum lipids were measured. Body weight and daily activity were maintained in all the groups throughout the experiment. The egg white group showed a similar decrease in the total cholesterol (Total-C) concentration but a greater increase of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration as compared to the tofu group and a greater decrease in Total-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations and a greater increase in the HDL-C concentration as compared to the cheese group (p < 0.05). The results indicate the favorable effects of egg white in the control of hypercholesterolemia.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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jboldman
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24/06/2018 1:24 am  

are egg whites high is cholesterol? Yes. Is that a reason to not eat them, in most cases probably not unless you are one of the population that exhibits a hypersensitivity to them. I used to eat 1 whole egg to six egg whites but started including the egg yolks after doing the research and following my blood tests. My advice, is moderation, no problem. if, like me, you eat 8 eggs at a time, try it for a while prior to having to cholesterol and lipids checked. If it turns out you are one of the majority that does not have a problem, go for it. jb


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jboldman
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24/06/2018 2:10 am  

are egg whites high is cholesterol? Yes. Is that a reason to not eat them, in most cases probably not unless you are one of the population that exhibits a hypersensitivity to them. I used to eat 1 whole egg to six egg whites but started including the egg yolks after doing the research and following my blood tests. My advice, is moderation, no problem. if, like me, you eat 8 eggs at a time, try it for a while prior to having to cholesterol and lipids checked. If it turns out you are one of the majority that does not have a problem, go for it. jb


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liftsiron
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24/06/2018 2:47 am  
Posted by: jboldman
are egg whites high is cholesterol? Yes. Is that a reason to not eat them, in most cases probably not unless you are one of the population that exhibits a hypersensitivity to them. I used to eat 1 whole egg to six egg whites but started including the egg yolks after doing the research and following my blood tests. My advice, is moderation, no problem. if, like me, you eat 8 eggs at a time, try it for a while prior to having to cholesterol and lipids checked. If it turns out you are one of the majority that does not have a problem, go for it. jb

lol, I think you mean yolks in the beginning of your post.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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guijr
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24/06/2018 3:47 am  

LOL, two (same) posts is a row Jbol .

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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guijr
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24/06/2018 4:23 am  

That's right Jbol, systematic blood monitoring means a lot to me as I eat 6 to 8 medium-size whole eggs per day.

Posted by: jboldman
are egg whites high is cholesterol? Yes. Is that a reason to not eat them, in most cases probably not unless you are one of the population that exhibits a hypersensitivity to them. I used to eat 1 whole egg to six egg whites but started including the egg yolks after doing the research and following my blood tests. My advice, is moderation, no problem. if, like me, you eat 8 eggs at a time, try it for a while prior to having to cholesterol and lipids checked. If it turns out you are one of the majority that does not have a problem, go for it. jb

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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HugeDeep
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24/06/2018 5:11 am  

From what i can tell eggs dont seem to bother the average person, the problem comes when said "person" ingests a few eggs but throws a roll of jimmy dean, half stick of butter, pound of bacon, and on and on. Eggs are really good for you but there are those out there with "sensitivity" to eggs.

"SPES ET FIDES"


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