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Nandi
(@nandi)
Estimable Member
Joined:2 months  ago
Posts: 100
02/08/2018 2:26 pm  

Yes. The chronic hyperglycemia of type 2 diabetes is directly toxic to pancreatic beta cells. People aren't sure of the exact mechanism but oxidative stress is thought to be a key factor. High levels of free fatty acids are also beta cell toxic but only in the presence of high glucose levels. So hyperglycemia gets to the beta cells both directly and indirectly. This hyperglycemia eventually leads to beta cell destruction and the need to go on insulin. If you can reduce the hyperglycemia with oral antidiabetic agents and exogenous insulin you can slow the progression of the beta cell destruction. Doctors used to wait until beta cell destruction had progressed before prescribing insulin, but now they are starting to administer it early on in the disease.


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Nandi
(@nandi)
Estimable Member
Joined:2 months  ago
Posts: 100
02/08/2018 3:25 pm  

As to your second question, I really don't know. It makes sense, if you are insulin resistant from GH use, as many people are, or even from anabolic steroids. Whether it would matter in someone who had a normal glucose tolerance I don't know.


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omnibus
(@omnibus)
Active Member
Joined:2 months  ago
Posts: 9
02/08/2018 4:15 pm  

quote:


The chronic hyperglycemia of type 2 diabetes is directly toxic to pancreatic beta cells. People aren't sure of the exact mechanism but oxidative stress is thought to be a key factor. High levels of free fatty acids are also beta cell toxic but only in the presence of high glucose levels. So hyperglycemia gets to the beta cells both directly and indirectly. This hyperglycemia eventually leads to beta cell destruction and the need to go on insulin. If you can reduce the hyperglycemia with oral antidiabetic agents and exogenous insulin you can slow the progression of the beta cell destruction. Doctors used to wait until beta cell destruction had progressed before prescribing insulin, but now they are starting to administer it early on in the disease.


Thanks.Very interesting.


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omnibus
(@omnibus)
Active Member
Joined:2 months  ago
Posts: 9
02/08/2018 5:12 pm  

Just remembered something about a friend who became type 2 diabetic as a result of an adverse reaction to an antibiotic drug which destroyed his pancreas.Anyway,he told me that when he ended up in hospital finally(after a week of losing weight dramatically)he was put on insulin which made his pancreas "partially recover" and regain function for a while.
So,exo-insulin can protect the pancreas in situations of hyperglycemia it seems(maybe when doing lots of GH also e.t.c).


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