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jboldman
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07/09/2020 10:15 pm  

we are all familiar with taking insulin after workouts to drive glucose into our muscles, here we find that naringenin (grapefruit) appears to have the same effect. perhaps a glass of grapefruit juice with those after wo carbs is the ticket for those of us not willing to risk insulin.

jb

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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2010 Jun 14. [Epub ahead of print]

Naringenin, a citrus flavonoid, increases muscle cell glucose uptake via AMPK.
Zygmunt K, Faubert B, Macneil J, Tsiani E.

Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada L2S 3A1.

Abstract
Naringenin, a flavonoid found in high concentrations in grapefruit, has been reported to have antioxidant, antiatherogenic, and anticancer effects. Effects on lipid and glucose metabolism have also been reported. Naringenin is structurally similar to the polyphenol resveratrol, that has been reported to activate the SIRT1 protein deacetylase and to have antidiabetic properties. In the present study we examined the direct effects of naringenin on skeletal muscle glucose uptake and investigated the mechanism involved. Naringenin stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Maximum stimulation was seen with 75 muM naringenin for 2 hours (192.8+/-24%, p<0.01), a response comparable to maximum insulin response (190.1+/-13%, p<0.001). Similar to insulin, naringenin did not increase glucose uptake in myoblasts indicating that GLUT4 glucose transporters may be involved in the naringenin-stimulated glucose uptake. In addition, naringenin did not have a significant effect on basal or insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation while significantly increased AMPK phosphorylation/activation. Furthermore, silencing of AMPK, using siRNA approach, abolished the naringenin-stimulated glucose uptake. The SIRT1 inhibitors nicotinamide and EX527 did not have an effect on naringenin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Our data show that naringenin increases glucose uptake by skeletal muscle cells in an AMPK-dependent manner.


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Seabiscuit Hogg
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07/09/2020 10:46 pm  

Good find!

Seabiscuit Hogg is a fictious internet character. It is not recommended that you receive medical advice from fictious internet characters.

SBH :)


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pillsbury
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07/09/2020 11:10 pm  

you can buy Naringenin in supplement form with ascorbic acid. seems like it might be worth trying


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Seabiscuit Hogg
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07/09/2020 11:27 pm  

I'm wondering if a glass of grapefruit juice would be enougth for my reg pwo drink. I usually do about 50 grs of dextrose. Don't wanna jack my blood glucose.

Seabiscuit Hogg is a fictious internet character. It is not recommended that you receive medical advice from fictious internet characters.

SBH :)


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jboldman
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07/09/2020 11:47 pm  

pillsbury, where did you find the naringenin with C?


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jboldman
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08/09/2020 12:17 am  

turns out this stuff may be good for cardiovascular purposes as well:

Can J Cardiol. 2010 Mar;26 Suppl A:17A-21A.

Antiatherogenic properties of flavonoids: implications for cardiovascular health.
Mulvihill EE, Huff MW.

Vascular Biology, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract
Epidemiological studies suggest that higher flavonoid intake from fruits and vegetables is associated with decreased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms explaining this observation remain unclear, but current evidence suggests that flavonoids may exert their effects through the improvement of cardiovascular risk factors. The present review summarizes data suggesting that flavonoids improve endothelial function. inhibit low-density lipoprotein oxidation, decrease blood pressure and improve dyslipidemia. A large number of studies have reported the impact of consuming flavonoid-rich foods on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk in healthy volunteers or at-risk individuals. Most studies have focused on cocoa, soy, and green and black tea. Recent evidence suggests that some polyphenols in their purified form, including resveratrol, berberine and naringenin, have beneficial effects on dyslipidemia in humans and/or animal models. In a mouse model of cardiovascular disease, naringenin treatment, through correction of dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia and obesity, attenuated atherosclerosis. Therefore, the beneficial effects of flavonoids on multiple risk factors may explain, in part, the observed beneficial effects of flavonoids on cardiovascular disease.


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pillsbury
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08/09/2020 12:41 am  

iherb.com


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Trevdog
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08/09/2020 1:04 am  

Grapefruit also increases bioavailability of certain oral medications, and I believe that includes some oral steroids such as oxandrolone. I wonder if the naringenin is what does that?


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Bananaman
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08/09/2020 1:20 am  

Grapefruit has a potent effect on various liver enzymes, it might be worth checking this list before starting in case there is a potential effect on any other medications you may be taking:

http://www.powernetdesign.com/grape...GJDIsummary.pdf


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jboldman
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08/09/2020 1:48 am  

the bergamottin in the grapefruit that alters the drug metabolism of many drugs via the cyp p450 pathway, basically almost all oral drugs are metabolized via the cyp p450 pathway via different subgroups. in grapefruit's case it is the 3A4 group which metabolizes many many oral drugs including some statins, some pain killers and others. many presriptions have warning labels wrt grapefruit. if you are careful and inclined to be experimental you can research this and play with your meds a little. not recommended without a lot of research. if anyone is interested we could start a new thread on this, very very interesting. grapefruit is only one of many inducers or inhibitors of this complex pathway


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jboldman
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08/09/2020 2:15 am  

i found loads of c + bioflavanoids that included naringenin but nothing with just c and naringenin.

Posted by: pillsbury
iherb.com

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Bananaman
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08/09/2020 2:34 am  

that reminds me of a thread from a few months back, I think it was a study showing Nsaids increased Testosterone bioavailability via a similar mechanism. Good idea JB- if were all using things like NSAiD's or potentially grapefruit it would be good to know what meds we need to be safe with & what med doses we can potentially exploit via the liver enzyme route


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pillsbury
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08/09/2020 3:00 am  
Posted by: jboldman
i found loads of c + bioflavanoids that included naringenin but nothing with just c and naringenin.

you are right, i didnt read very carefully. im sure you could call a supplement company and find a distributor that they get there naringenin from. there is one here that can make anything custom, i could ask them if your interested


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jboldman
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08/09/2020 3:26 am  

cant hurt to ask. i checked with beyond a century, my fav wholesaler, and they do not have it.

jb


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liftsiron
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08/09/2020 3:45 am  

Naringenin is supposed to increase the effectiveness of oral aas as well.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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