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kml0331
(@kml0331)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 31
31/12/2018 1:04 pm  

has anyone tried cla for fat loss???? opinions??? also please feel free to post studies on effects on blood lipids/insulin sensitivity/lean body mass etc........i want to make this the ultimate thread on cla...........

Isomer-specific effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on adiposity and lipid metabolism.

Evans M, Brown J, McIntosh M.

Department of Medicine/Endocrinology, Emory University, 30322, Atlanta, GA, USA

Isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), unsaturated fatty acids found in ruminant meats and dairy products, have been shown to reduce adiposity and alter lipid metabolism in animal, human, and cell culture studies. In particular, dietary CLA decreases body fat and increases lean body mass in certain rodents, chickens, and pigs, depending on the isomer, dose, and duration of treatment. However, the effects of CLA on human adiposity are conflicting because these studies have used different mixtures and levels of CLA isomers and diverse subject populations. Potential antiobesity mechanisms of CLA include decreased preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation into mature adipocytes, decreased fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis, and increased energy expenditure, lipolysis, and fatty acid oxidation. This review will address the current research on CLA's effects on human and animal adiposity and lipid metabolism as well as potential mechanism(s) responsible for CLA's antiobesity properties.

PMID: 12231420 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Br J Nutr 2002 Sep;88(3):243-51 Related Articles, Links

The effect of dietary supplementation using isomeric blends of conjugated linoleic acid on lipid metabolism in healthy human subjects.

Noone EJ, Roche HM, Nugent AP, Gibney MJ.

Unit of Nutrition, Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland. enoone@tcd.ie

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid. Studies using animal models have shown that CLA reduces adiposity, improves plasma lipoprotein metabolism and insulin sensitivity and reduces arteriosclerosis. Whilst CLA may have therapeutic potential with regard to coronary artery disease risk factors in human subjects, there has been little investigation into its effects in human subjects. This current study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation using two isomeric blends of CLA on triacylglycerol (TAG)-rich lipoprotein metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport in human subjects and evaluates whether CLA modulated cardiovascular disease risk factors. Fifty-one normolipidaemic subjects participated in this randomised double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive 3 g cis-9,trans-11-trans-10,cis-12 isomeric blend (50 : 50) or a cis-9,trans-11-trans-10,cis-12 isomeric blend (80 : 20) CLA or linoleic acid (control)/d for 8 weeks. The 50 : 50 CLA isomer blend significantly reduced (P<or=0.005) fasting plasma TAG concentrations. The 80 : 20 CLA isomer blend significantly reduced (P<or=0.05) VLDL-cholesterol concentrations. CLA supplementation had no significant effect on LDL-cholesterol, HDL-lipid-protein composition or reverse cholesterol transport. CLA supplementation had no effect on body weight, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the cis-9,trans-11 CLA isomer was incorporated into total plasma lipids following supplementation with both isomeric blends of CLA. The present study demonstrates that CLA supplementation significantly improves plasma TAG and VLDL metabolism in human subjects. The study confirms that some of the cardio-protective effects of CLA that were shown in animal studies are relevant to man.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 12207834 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

J Strength Cond Res 2002 Aug;16(3):325-34 Related Articles, Links

Effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation during resistance training on body composition, bone density, strength, and selected hematological markers.

Kreider RB, Ferreira MP, Greenwood M, Wilson M, Almada AL.

Exercise and Sport Nutrition Laboratory, Department of Human Movement Sciences and Education, University of Memphis, Tennessee 38152, USA. richard_kreider@baylor.edu

Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are essential fatty acids that have been reported in animal studies to decrease catabolism, promote fat loss, increase bone density, enhance immunity, and serve as an antiatherogenic and anticarcinogenic agent. For this reason, CLA has been marketed as a supplement to promote weight loss and general health. CLA has also been heavily marketed to resistance-trained athletes as a supplement that may help lessen catabolism, decrease body fat, and promote greater gains in strength and muscle mass during training. Although basic research is promising, few studies have examined whether CLA supplementation during training enhances training adaptations and/or affects markers of health. This study evaluated whether CLA supplementation during resistance training affects body composition, strength, and/or general markers of catabolism and immunity. In a double-blind and randomized manner, 23 experienced, resistance-trained subjects were matched according to body mass and training volume and randomly assigned to supplement their diet with 9 g;pdd(-1) of an olive oil placebo or 6 g;pdd(-1) of CLA with 3 g;pdd(-1) of fatty acids for 28 days. Prior to and following supplementation, fasting blood samples, total body mass, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) determined body composition, and isotonic bench press and leg press 1 repetition maximums (1RMs) were determined. Results revealed that although some statistical trends were observed with moderate to large effect sizes, CLA supplementation did not significantly affect (p > 0.05) changes in total body mass, fat-free mass, fat mass, percent body fat, bone mass, strength, serum substrates, or general markers of catabolism and immunity during training. These findings indicate that CLA does not appear to possess significant ergogenic value for experienced resistance-trained athletes.


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kml0331
(@kml0331)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 31
31/12/2018 1:36 pm  

Diabetes Care 2002 Sep;25(9):1516-21 Related Articles, Links

Treatment with dietary trans10cis12 conjugated linoleic acid causes isomer-specific insulin resistance in obese men with the metabolic syndrome.

Riserus U, Arner P, Brismar K, Vessby B.

Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. ulf.riserus@pubcare.uu.se

OBJECTIVE: Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a group of dietary fatty acids with antiobesity and antidiabetic effects in some animals. The trans10cis12 (t10c12) CLA isomer seems to cause these effects, including improved insulin sensitivity. Whether such isomer-specific effects occur in humans is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether t10c12 CLA or a commercial CLA mixture could improve insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, or body composition in obese men with signs of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind controlled trial, abdominally obese men (n = 60) were treated with 3.4 g/day CLA (isomer mixture), purified t10c12 CLA, or placebo. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, serum hormones, lipids, and anthropometry were assessed before and after 12 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: Baseline metabolic status was similar between groups. Unexpectedly, t10c12 CLA increased insulin resistance (19%; P < 0.01) and glycemia (4%; P < 0.001) and reduced HDL cholesterol (-4%; P < 0.01) compared with placebo, whereas body fat, sagittal abdominal diameter, and weight decreased versus baseline, but the difference was not significantly different from placebo. The CLA mixture did not change glucose metabolism, body composition, or weight compared with placebo but lowered HDL cholesterol (-2%; P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These results reveal important isomer-specific metabolic actions of CLA in abdominally obese humans. A CLA-induced insulin resistance has previously been described only in lipodystrophic mice. Considering the use of CLA-supplements among obese individuals, it is important to clarify the clinical consequences of these results, but they also provide physiological insights into the role of specific dietary fatty acids as modulators of insulin resistance in humans.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 12196420 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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hammer70
(@hammer70)
New Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 1
31/12/2018 2:10 pm  

I used it before and it does work. I got a little more veiny and bf% went down.


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Torsten
(@torsten)
New Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 2
31/12/2018 2:48 pm  

It works while bulking to keep fat increase at bay. But you need high dosages (10-15 g CLA, Tonalin brand) for longer periods to really notice the difference.


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kml0331
(@kml0331)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 31
31/12/2018 3:43 pm  

this study, at least in obese people, indicates anything over 3.4 g a day may not work much better

J Nutr 2000 Dec;130(12):2943-8 Related Articles, Links

Conjugated linoleic acid reduces body fat mass in overweight and obese humans.

Blankson H, Stakkestad JA, Fagertun H, Thom E, Wadstein J, Gudmundsen O.

Scandinavian Clinical Research AS, N-2027 Kjeller, Norway.

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to reduce body fat mass (BFM) in animals. To investigate the dose-response relationships of conjugated linoleic acid with regard to BFM in humans, a randomized, double-blind study including 60 overweight or obese volunteers (body mass index 25-35 kg/m(2)) was performed. The subjects were divided into five groups receiving placebo (9 g olive oil), 1.7, 3.4, 5.1 or 6.8 g conjugated linoleic acid per day for 12 wk, respectively. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure body composition [measurements at wk 0 (baseline), 6 and 12]. Of the 60 subjects, 47 completed the study. Eight subjects withdrew from the study due to adverse events; however, no differences among treatment groups were found regarding adverse events. Repeated-measures analysis showed that a significantly higher reduction in BFM was found in the conjugated linoleic acid groups compared with the placebo group (P: = 0.03). The reduction of body fat within the groups was significant for the 3.4 and 6.8 g CLA groups (P: = 0.05 and P: = 0.02, respectively). No significant differences among the groups were observed in lean body mass, body mass index, blood safety variables or blood lipids. The data suggest that conjugated linoleic acid may reduce BFM in humans and that no additional effect on BFM is achieved with doses > 3.4 g CLA/d.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 11110851 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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JGUNS
(@jguns)
Member Moderator
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 138
31/12/2018 4:38 pm  

It also needs to be the cis 9 trans 11 isomer. Cheap CLA does not contain that. I will look up some studies I used to reference on this topic.


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Torsten
(@torsten)
New Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 2
31/12/2018 5:24 pm  

kml0331, my recommendation was based purely on empirical evidence. From the study you quoted, you're right, it seems unneccesary excessive.


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kml0331
(@kml0331)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 31
31/12/2018 6:03 pm  

jguns, i have been doing alot of reading on cla and it appears, at least from the abstracts i have read, that the trans 10 cis 12 isomer is responsible for fat loss and the cis 9 trans 11 isomer possesses more anticarcinogenic properties......but the biological activity of each is still not well understood. i am interested in cla because it has been shown in animals and humans to reduce bodyfat and it does not work like the other metabolic stimulants such as ephedrine, caffeine, or clenbuterol as you already know.

Prog Lipid Res 2001 Jul;40(4):283-98 Related Articles, Links

The biologically active isomers of conjugated linoleic acid.

Pariza MW, Park Y, Cook ME.

Department of Food Microbiology and Toxicology, Food Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 53706, USA. mwpariza@facstaff.wisc.edu

Numerous physiological effects are attributed to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). The purpose of this presentation is to consider these effects with respect to the cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomers. We review previously published data and present new findings that relate to underlying biochemical mechanisms of action. Both isomers are natural products. The cis-9,trans-11 isomer is the principal dietary form of CLA, but the concentrations of this isomer and the trans-10,cis-12 isomer in dairy products or beef vary depending on the diet fed to cows or steers, respectively. The trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomer exerts specific effects on adipocytes, in particular reducing the uptake of lipid by inhibiting the activities of lipoprotein lipase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. The trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomer also affects lipid metabolism in cultured Hep-G2 human liver cells, whereas both the cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomers appear to be active in inhibiting carcinogenesis in animal models. We present new findings indicating that the cis-9,trans-11 CLA isomer enhances growth and probably feed efficiency in young rodents. Accordingly, the effects of CLA on body composition (induced by trans-10,cis-12 CLA) and growth/feed efficiency (induced by cis-9,trans-11 CLA) appear to be due to separate biochemical mechanisms. We also show that a 19-carbon CLA cognate (conjugated nonadecadienoic acid, CNA) inhibits lipoprotein lipase activity as effectively as CLA in cultured 3t3-L1 adipocytes. Presumably, CNA is metabolized differently than the 18-carbon CLA isomers, so this finding indicates direct activity of the administered compound as opposed to acting via a metabolite.

J Nutr 2001 Sep;131(9):2316-21 Related Articles, Links

Trans-10, cis-12, but not cis-9, trans-11, conjugated linoleic acid attenuates lipogenesis in primary cultures of stromal vascular cells from human adipose tissue.

Brown JM, Halvorsen YD, Lea-Currie YR, Geigerman C, McIntosh M.

Graduate Program in Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 27402, USA.

We have previously shown that both a commercially available mixture of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers and the trans-10, cis-12 isomer of CLA reduced the triglyceride (TG) content and induced apoptosis in differentiating cultures of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. However, the influence of CLA isomers on differentiating human (pre)adipocytes is unknown. Therefore, we conducted a series of studies using primary cultures of stromal vascular cells isolated from human adipose tissue to determine: 1) the influence of seeding density and thiazolidinedione (TZD) concentration on TG content; 2) the chronic dose response of cis-9, trans-11 CLA vs. trans-10, cis-12 CLA on TG content; 3) whether chronic linoleic acid supplementation could rescue the TG content of CLA-treated cultures; and 4) whether trans-10, cis-12-mediated reduction in cellular TG was due to decreased lipogenesis and/or increased lipolysis. In expt. 1, the TG content [micromol/(L x 10(6) cells)] increased as both seeding density and TZD concentration increased. For example, cultures seeded at 4 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) and supplemented with 10 micromol/L BRL 49653 had 10-fold more TG than similarly seeded cultures without BRL 49653. In expt. 2, TG content decreased as the level of trans-10, cis-12 CLA increased from 1 to 10 micromol/L, whereas the TG content increased with increasing concentrations of either linoleic acid or cis-9, trans-11 CLA. In expt. 3, linoleic acid supplementation restored the TG content of cultures treated with trans-10, cis-12 CLA compared with cultures treated with CLA alone, suggesting that attenuation of TG content by CLA is reversible. In expt. 4, glucose incorporation into total lipid decreased with increasing levels of trans-10, cis-12 CLA, whereas neither CLA isomer acutely affected lipolysis. These data suggest that the reported antiobesity actions of a supplement containing a crude mixture of CLA isomers given to humans may be due to inhibition of lipogenesis by the trans-10, cis-12 isomer.

torsten: i have experimented with cla and i have found, at least pertaining to me, that 6 capsules (about 4 gm) have reduced my body fat while maintaining or even gaining a couple of pounds. i am lean to begin with though, before cla my body fat was about 9%

LASTLY WHY IS NANDI KEEPING SILENT ON THIS POST!!! I WANT YOUR INPUT


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Tkarrde
(@tkarrde)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 5
31/12/2018 6:53 pm  
Posted by: Torsten
It works while bulking to keep fat increase at bay. But you need high dosages (10-15 g CLA, Tonalin brand) for longer periods to really notice the difference.

This is my understanding as well.


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Fonz
 Fonz
(@fonz)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 46
31/12/2018 7:29 pm  
Posted by: JGUNS
It also needs to be the cis 9 trans 11 isomer. Cheap CLA does not contain that. I will look up some studies I used to reference on this topic.

If you use CLA use Tonalin.(74-82% CLA)

Minimum: 15g/day (I have gone as high as 30g/day)

(Take an aveage of 78%)

Thats(min): 11.7g CLA

Btw, CLA has minimal impact on glucose levels. What it does, is DECREASE fat formation from glucose. Same as an A2 blocker like Yohimbine.

That why it works.

I have studied its effects via a glucose meter and found this to be the case. The findings will be published in a short while.(I have a lot of work to do at the moment in school)

And ALWAYS take it with food if taking 6g+. If you don't, say hello to SUPREME INDIGESTION....lol

Fonz

If I want to add flavor to my cooking. . . . . . . I just burn it

There is NO such thing as over training just under EATING. ~ Trey Brewer


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JGUNS
(@jguns)
Member Moderator
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 138
31/12/2018 8:14 pm  

quote:


jguns, i have been doing alot of reading on cla and it appears, at least from the abstracts i have read, that the trans 10 cis 12 isomer is responsible for fat loss and the cis 9 trans 11 isomer possesses more anticarcinogenic properties......but the biological activity of each is still not well understood. i am interested in cla because it has been shown in animals and humans to reduce bodyfat and it does not work like the other metabolic stimulants such as ephedrine, caffeine, or clenbuterol as you already know.

Actually, the 10 Cis 12 primarily prevents lipogenesis, it has not been shown to increase fat burning. It actually inhibits LPL. The idea of megadosing CLA actually came from a doctor Lowry who purports that it may increase feed efficiency. It is true that the 9,11 isomer is not implicated in fat burning or inhibition of lipogenesis, but muscle hypertrophy.

This post was modified 6 months ago by Admin

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Judah Bauer
(@judah-bauer)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 5
31/12/2018 8:59 pm  

Ok I'm bumping this up for a couple questions.

1) which isomer is the tonalin brand?

2) Is the consensus now that mega dosing isn't necessary and 4g/day is fine?

3) Is it essential that doses be divided throughout the day?

4) I have an older bottle of Tonalin w/ still quite a bit left. Its maybe a year old. Any reason to think it wouldn't still be ok?

Thanks.


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virtualcyber
(@virtualcyber)
New Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 4
31/12/2018 9:44 pm  
Posted by: Judah Bauer
Ok I'm bumping this up for a couple questions.

1) which isomer is the tonalin brand?

2) Is the consensus now that mega dosing isn't necessary and 4g/day is fine?

3) Is it essential that doses be divided throughout the day?

4) I have an older bottle of Tonalin w/ still quite a bit left. Its maybe a year old. Any reason to think it wouldn't still be ok?

Thanks.

Judah Bauer:

1. All brands I know contain both isomers.

2. The consensus is based on one or two studies that showed equal fat regain at both 6 g and 4 g dosing per day. But this issue is far from resolved. Let me put it this way -- 4 g would be the minimum dose at which the researchers found CLA to be effective.

3. As of now, the preference is to take CLA at one sitting. Here is the logic (it is probably flawed, but here it goes); it is based on the fact that (1) the liver burns CLA preferentiall OVER other types of fat and (2) CLA must reach the fat cells and be incorporated there to do its magic. Say that the liver can burn 2 g of CLA in 4 hours and that you divide 4 g of your CLA into two doses, at morning and at night. Since your liver can handle 2 g, almost of all of your ingested CLA will be oxidized by your liver. So, no CLA will be able to reach your fat cells. If you took 4 g in one sitting, then, perhaps 2 g will be left intact by the liver (since it can only handle 2 g in allotted time) and reach your fat cells.

[To me, the preceding logic sounds messsed up.]

Also, the preference is to take CLA with carbs, so as to minimize CLA oxidation at your liver.

4. I think it should be fine. I just don't think it will go through spontaneous breakdown. Last edited by virtualcyber on 04-07-2003 at 10:25 AM


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enrage
(@enrage)
New Member
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 4
31/12/2018 10:31 pm  
Posted by: Fonz
If you use CLA use Tonalin.(74-82% CLA)

Minimum: 15g/day (I have gone as high as 30g/day)

(Take an aveage of 78%)

Thats(min): 11.7g CLA

Btw, CLA has minimal impact on glucose levels. What it does, is DECREASE fat formation from glucose. Same as an A2 blocker like Yohimbine.

That why it works.

I have studied its effects via a glucose meter and found this to be the case. The findings will be published in a short while.(I have a lot of work to do at the moment in school)

And ALWAYS take it with food if taking 6g+. If you don't, say hello to SUPREME INDIGESTION....lol

Fonz

where do u buy your CLA?


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Judah Bauer
(@judah-bauer)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 5
31/12/2018 11:04 pm  

Virtual cyber, thanks for the great info. Another question....I was under the impression "Tonalin" was a company...but now I see many different "Tonalin" brands...are they all good? thanks.


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