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When to change up a workout?


Twindragon
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I was wondering when is a good time to add in some advanced techniques into a workout. Like say for instance you are doing biceps and figure you should add 21's, negatives, etc when is a good time to add this in to give you that little bit extra.


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jboldman
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i do it when i plateau, or when i seem to be having trouble getting a "burn" or simply after a while and i am getting bored with my current workout.

jb


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liftsiron
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Posted by: jboldman
i do it when i plateau, or when i seem to be having trouble getting a "burn" or simply after a while and i am getting bored with my current workout.

jb

Covered the bases.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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guijr
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Variation is key for continuous adaptations in mass and muscle strength and in order to prevent injury. I change my workouts (reps, sets, intensity, order and exercise selection, tempo, etc.) at least once a month.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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MarcusW
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Agree with guijir a 100% on the importance of variation for continual adaptations.
But instead of looking at it as changing up your routine from time to time, I would be (and am) a little more systematic and plan this variation. In other words: use a periodization approach.
Not because being anal about your training is fun, but because planned variation (if done skillfully) is a lot more effective than just randomly changing things up.

Just remember, somewhere, a little Chinese girl is warming up with your max (Jim Conroy, Olympic weightlifting coach)


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wyld
 wyld
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sometimes when i like my routine, but am starting to lose the "burn" i find that changing the order of my exercises helps a lot. you'll probably find yourself doing more weight for those exercises you used to do last, but now do first and vice versa. especially if you're like me who tend to do the bigger/heavier lifts first and the lighter/more repetitious sets last.


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guijr
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Periodisation (systematic variation) is important in sports training and conditioning, but I just wanted to say that it's not an easy job, in fact it's a very difficult science, I mean lots of paperwork to do everyday.

I'm lucky to had the chance to know in person some of the most important guys on the field of Methodology Of Training and Periodisation: Tudor Bompa (Romania), Vladimir Platonov (Ukraine), Armando Forteza de la Rosa (Cuba) and Steven Fleck (USA). Hell those classes were tough, but let me understand some fundamental principles of these sciences.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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liftsiron
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Another point often overlooked that taking a week off from the gym now and then giving the body a full rest often leads to renewed gains.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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MarcusW
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quote:


Another point often overlooked that taking a week off from the gym now and then giving the body a full rest often leads to renewed gains.


= periodization as well

Just remember, somewhere, a little Chinese girl is warming up with your max (Jim Conroy, Olympic weightlifting coach)


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guijr
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Posted by: liftsiron
Another point often overlooked that taking a week off from the gym now and then giving the body a full rest often leads to renewed gains.

I agree, good for your joints, specially good for the central nervous system (CNS), etc. It's often called Transition (or T) phase in Periodised Training Programs.

"The medals don't mean anything and the glory doesn't last. It's all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing" ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee.


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