Alarming Warning for Men Who Drink Milk  

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needsize
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01/10/2018 2:50 pm  

Middle-age men who drink just a glass or two of milk every day are raising their risk of developing Parkinson's disease later in life, report Reuters and the BBC News of research from the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville and Korea University in Seoul.

It's not known what ingredient in milk is responsible for the increased risk, but the researchers say it does not appear to be calcium. It's possible that the effect is caused by a contaminant in milk. Previous research has shown that milk does not pose the same risk for women.

The study of 7,504 men ages 45 to 68 who were enrolled in the Honolulu Heart Program examined dietary intake over a 30-year period beginning in the late 1960s. Of these men, 128 developed Parkinson's disease. Those who consumed the most milk daily had the highest risk of developing the disease, which was about 2.3 times the risk of the men who did not drink milk.

It's very important to note that even among the heavy milk drinkers, the risk of developing Parkinson's is still very small, about 14.9 cases per 10,000 people who drink more than 16 ounces of milk a day.

Parkinson's disease, a degenerative disease of the nervous system, causes a noticeable trembling of the arms and legs, stiffness and rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement. It typically affects people who are 50 and older, although 10 percent to 20 percent of patients are diagnosed before their 40th birthday. Perhaps the most famous Parkinson's patient is actor Michael J. Fox, who was diagnosed at age 30. The cause is not known, but those with the disease have a shortage of a dopamine in their brains, a chemical that affects movement.

The study findings were published in the medical journal Neurology.

Here is the abstract that this article was based on:

Consumption of milk and calcium in midlife and the future risk of Parkinson disease

M. Park, MD, PhD, G. W. Ross, MD, H. Petrovitch, MD, L. R. White, MD, K. H. Masaki, MD, J. S. Nelson, MD, C. M. Tanner, MD, PhD, J. D. Curb, MD, P. L. Blanchette, MD and R. D. Abbott, PhD

From the Korea University Genomic Institute (Drs. Park and Abbott) and Department of Neurology (Dr. Park), College of Medicine, Korea University, Ansan-Si, Republic of Korea; and Pacific Health Research Institute (Drs. Ross, Petrovitch, White, Masaki, Nelson, Curb, and Abbott), Department of Veterans Affairs (Drs. Ross, Petrovitch, and White), Kuakini Medical Center and Honolulu-Asia Aging Study (Drs. Ross, Petrovitch, White, Masaki, Curb, and Abbott), and Departments of Geriatric Medicine and Medicine (Drs. Ross, Petrovitch, White, Masaki, Curb, and Blanchette), University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Parkinson’s Institute (Drs. Ross and Tanner), Sunnyvale, CA, and Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (Dr. Abbott), University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. R.D. Abbott, Department of Health Evaluation Sciences, University of Virginia Health System, PO Box 800717, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0717; e-mail: rda3e@virginia.edu

Objective: To examine the relation between milk and calcium intake in midlife and the risk of Parkinson disease (PD).

Methods: Findings are based on dietary intake observed from 1965 to 1968 in 7,504 men ages 45 to 68 in the Honolulu Heart Program. Men were followed for 30 years for incident PD.

Results: In the course of follow-up, 128 developed PD (7.1/10,000 person-years). Age-adjusted incidence of PD increased with milk intake from 6.9/10,000 person-years in men who consumed no milk to 14.9/10,000 person-years in men who consumed >16 oz/day (p = 0.017). After further adjustment for dietary and other factors, there was a 2.3-fold excess of PD (95% CI 1.3 to 4.1) in the highest intake group (>16 oz/day) vs those who consumed no milk. The effect of milk consumption on PD was also independent of the intake of calcium. Calcium from dairy and nondairy sources had no apparent relation with the risk of PD.

Conclusions: Findings suggest that milk intake is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease. Whether observed effects are mediated through nutrients other than calcium or through neurotoxic contaminants warrants further study.

Supported by a contract (N01-AG-4-2149) and grant (1-R01-AG17155-01A1) from the National Institute on Aging, a contract (N01-HC-05102) from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, a grant (1-R01-NS41265-01) from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the Office of Research and Development, Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, and by the U.S. Department of the Army (DAMD17-98-1-8621).

The information contained in this article does not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the U.S. Government, and no official endorsement should be inferred.

Received August 24, 2004. Accepted in final form November 23, 2004.


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Dodnof
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01/10/2018 3:48 pm  

Uh oh, thats not good as I drink hella milk on a daily basis.


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jboldman
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01/10/2018 4:31 pm  

take some calcium supplements and avoid the extra calories and fat.

jb


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Dodnof
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01/10/2018 5:07 pm  

Calcium supplements just dont taste that good with a big peanut butter and jelly sandwich!!


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Trevdog
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01/10/2018 6:04 pm  

It has been about 17 years since I took statistics so I can't really opine on whether this could have happened by chance or whether this study truly warrants the conclusion that there is a direct causal link between increased milk consumption and parkinson's disease. Is anybody up on statistics?

I go through 2-3 gallons of skim milk every week.


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bosshog
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01/10/2018 6:38 pm  
Posted by: Dodnof
Calcium supplements just dont taste that good with a big peanut butter and jelly sandwich!!

Man you took the words outa my mouth!!


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emg140
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01/10/2018 7:29 pm  

I recently finshed the statistics but without a detailed sampling plan, its pointless to do any analysis.

for example.
I can take the crime rate measured daily for the entire US. Cross this with other factors such as ice cream sales. After a thorough regression, everyone would be astounded that there would be a direct strong correlation between the sale of ice cream and crime.
Before Jessie Jackson, goes on national TV calling for the banning of ice cream, it would be good to point out that there are confounding factors at work. temperature increases, summer manufacturing layoffs, school vactions, etc.

My guess is that there are other risk factors available in the sampling group other than milk intake that can account for the correlation. Say those who drank more than 2 glasses a day worked around heavy equipment, or in chemical factories, or farms, or sat on thier collective asses.

A 0.017 p value doesn't say much except that its a fairly strong correlation and that explains the pretty narrow confidence interval (CI). p values below 0.05 show statistical significance, however the orignal hypothesis being tested would've been that the mean vaules of all the groups were equal.

These findings show smoke, but the responsible further study would then be to analyze those that fit the correlated group for other factors, and check for similarities. Like I said, smoke w/ no fire. It was even noted in the conclusion statement of the abstract.

I don't think from this you guys have anything to worry about just yet. although the results are quite interesting.

And after missing lunch today, I could go for one of those peanutbutter sandwiches!


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C-Dog
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01/10/2018 8:22 pm  

Check out the big brain on emg140! I think I'm catching the faint Aroma of Six Sigma and Minitab in the air.

emg140 nailed it. There is a difference between correlation and causation. There could be any number of lurking variables that are causing the results of this study. Incidentally, the likelihood is still incredibly low even for milk drinkers -- which is good, because (like Trevdog) I really have no problem going through 2-3 gallons per week.


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liftsiron
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01/10/2018 9:19 pm  

It looks like a study that was done with the sole purpose of linking milk consumption to Parkinson's disease. The study can't even define a reason as to why milk may cause the disease, just that a small number of male milk drinkers get it. You could probably get similiar findings with peanut butter, coffee, wheat germ or any number of other food products.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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Seabiscuit Hogg
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01/10/2018 9:51 pm  
Posted by: Dodnof
Calcium supplements just dont taste that good with a big peanut butter and jelly sandwich!!

LOL. That's what I'm talking about. I usually drink at least a quart a day.

Seabiscuit Hogg is a fictious internet character. It is not recommended that you receive medical advice from fictious internet characters.

SBH :)


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ready2explode
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02/10/2018 5:55 am  

Don't worry guys! Smoking decreases the risk of getting parkinson's! Just smoke to off set any problems caused by drinking milk

"In any contest between power and patience, bet on patience."
~W.B. Prescott

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."
~Albert Einstein


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needsize
(@needsize)
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02/10/2018 6:43 am  
Posted by: ready2explode
Don't worry guys! Smoking decreases the risk of getting parkinson's! Just smoke to off set any problems caused by drinking milk

but since nicotien reduces Testosterone production in men then we will have to supplement that.


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emg140
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02/10/2018 7:20 am  

C-dog,
you nailed it. and it isn't a faint aroma, its a rather nasty stench.

Minitab is the root of all that is evil and it quite often keeps me from the gym.


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C-Dog
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02/10/2018 8:05 am  

Men's Health magazine is another source notorious for using stats to make statements that are unfounded. In the current issue that state that there is higher percentage of overweight people who drink diet soda than non-overweight people. Consequently, diet soda makes you overweight.

My guess is that there's also a higher percentage of overweight people who drink regular soda than non-overweight people. Perhaps fit people drink water, green tea, milk, juice, etc. rather than any type of soda. Perhaps fat people drink diet soda because they are dieting. Perhaps overweight people drink diet soda so that they can "balance out" the super-sized double quarter pounder with cheese meal and hot fudge sundae they just ordered at McDonalds.

Again, just because two measurable things tend to appear around each other doesn't mean that one caused the other.


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Trevdog
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02/10/2018 8:55 am  

Well said, C-Dog.


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