Between Glutamine and Glutamine Peptide  

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ridewya
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01/05/2019 9:08 am  

Is this glutamine peptide really different from regular glutamine or is it just another marketing Hype like so called "special delivery system L-Arginine" ? pls help ?? anyone ? and pls tell me what is the difference

Another day, Another challange and Opportunity


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liftsiron
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01/05/2019 10:02 am  

I have used both and to be honest I never noticed a differance between the two. Especially when clalorie restricted I seem to get a big boost from l-glutimine though.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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pSimonkey
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01/05/2019 11:03 am  

likewise


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Bigr
 Bigr
(@bigr)
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01/05/2019 11:50 am  

There are much better/cheaper alternatives to glutamine!


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liftsiron
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01/05/2019 12:42 pm  
Posted by: Big'r
There are much better/cheaper alternatives to glutamine!

More info please.

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by Admin

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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Bigr
 Bigr
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01/05/2019 1:15 pm  

glutamine does not increase protein synthesis above basal levels, BCAAs do.
And it only returns protein degradation to "neutral" levels in a catabolic state. But carbs are equally effective in doing so and these are much cheaper.

Furthermore most amino acids are precursors of glutamine and BCAAs/carbs have a sparing effect on the glutamine levels.

12 g amino acids provide the same protein synthesis as does 70 g glutamine (and non essential amino acids don't have any value in this, so 6 g essential amino acids have the same effect as 70 g glutamine).


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liftsiron
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01/05/2019 1:23 pm  
Posted by: Big'r
glutamine does not increase protein synthesis above basal levels, BCAAs do.
And it only returns protein degradation to "neutral" levels in a catabolic state. But carbs are equally effective in doing so and these are much cheaper.

Furthermore most amino acids are precursors of glutamine and BCAAs/carbs have a sparing effect on the glutamine levels.

12 g amino acids provide the same protein synthesis as does 70 g glutamine (and non essential amino acids don't have any value in this, so 6 g essential amino acids have the same effect as 70 g glutamine).

When cutting or training extremely hard I always opt for a bcaa/taurine combo. I just recently got 2kg's of bcaa powder from usplabs.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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pSimonkey
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01/05/2019 1:25 pm  
Posted by: Big'r
glutamine does not increase protein synthesis above basal levels, BCAAs do.
And it only returns protein degradation to "neutral" levels in a catabolic state. But carbs are equally effective in doing so and these are much cheaper.

Furthermore most amino acids are precursors of glutamine and BCAAs/carbs have a sparing effect on the glutamine levels.

12 g amino acids provide the same protein synthesis as does 70 g glutamine (and non essential amino acids don't have any value in this, so 6 g essential amino acids have the same effect as 70 g glutamine).

Can you give reference for this info I am rather intrigued


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Bigr
 Bigr
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01/05/2019 1:28 pm  

GLUTAMINE DOES NOT INCREASE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

1)Results of tracer studies indicate that skeletal muscle contributes to approximately 70% of overall glutamine production in healthy adults; the contribution of de novo synthesis being estimated at approximately 60%. Direct and specific measurements of glutamine in intact muscle protein are 50% lower than assumed previously (G1).
2)Most amino acids are precursors for alanine and glutamine synthesis in skeletal muscle. Cysteine, leucine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, tyrosine, lysine, and phenylalanine increase the rate of glutamine synthesis. The progressive decline in alanine and glutamine synthesis noted on prolonged incubation is prevented by the addition of amino acids to the incubation medium (G2)

90% of the glutamine you take orally never even makes it to your muscles
-Systemic glutamine administration is ineffective in preventing muscle depletion, due to a relative inability of skeletal muscle to seize glutamine from the bloodstream. Transport from blood accounts for only 25% of the intramuscular glutamine pool turnover. In contrast, the intracellular pools of most essential amino acids, such as phenylalanine or leucine, derived largely from the extracellular space. Studies involving oral ingestion of stable isotope-labelled glutamine indicate that 50-70% of enterally administered glutamine is taken up during first pass by splanchnic organs (gut and liver). (G14).
-Glutamine orally is successful in elevating plasma glutamine at the peak concentration by 46%, which suggests that a substantial proportion of the oral load escaped utilization by the gut mucosal cells and uptake by the liver and kidneys. If the entire glutamine dose had been distributed within the blood (8% body wt) and extracellular fluid (20% lean body mass) compartments, then a 3-mM rise in blood glutamine concentration might have been expected, whereas plasma glutamine concentration was only observed to rise by 0.3 mM. This might suggest that only 10% of the oral dose reached the extracellular fluid compartments (G15).

Glutamine does not prevent exercise-induced immune impairment. Carbs do. And glutamine does not influence hormonal levels
-Consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking (G31).
-Intracellular glutamine concentration may not be compromised when plasma levels are decreased postexercise. In addition, a number of recent intervention studies with glutamine feeding demonstrate that, although the plasma concentration of glutamine is kept constant during and after acute, strenuous exercise, glutamine supplementation does not abolish the postexercise decrease in in vitro cellular immunity, including low lymphocyte number, impaired lymphocyte proliferation, impaired natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell activity, as well as low production rate and concentration of salivary IgA (G32).
-Glutamine supplementation abolished the postexercise decline in plasma glutamine concentration but had no effect on lymphocyte trafficking, NK and lymphokine-activated killer cell activities, T cell proliferation, catecholamines, growth hormone, insulin, or glucose (G33).
-Nutritional supplementation with glutamine abolishes the exercise-induced decline in plasma glutamine, but does not influence post-exercise immune impairment. However, carbohydrate loading diminishes most exercise effects of cytokines, lymphocyte and neutrophils (G34).

Glutamine does not increase protein synthesis
-Intravenous infusion of amino acids increases the fractional rate of mixed muscle protein synthesis, but addition of glutamine to the amino acid mixture does not further stimulate muscle protein synthesis rate in healthy young men and women (G6).
-Short intravenous infusion of glutamine does not acutely stimulate duodenal protein synthesis in well-nourished, growing dogs (G8).

Glutamine prevents protein degradation but not more effectively than carbs
-0,9 g/kg glutamine during resistance training has no significant effect on muscle performance, body composition or muscle protein degradation compared to 0,9 g/kg maltodextrin (G9).
-Glutamine preserves protein synthesis in Caco-2 cells submitted to "luminal fasting", but higher glutamine doses did not enhance protein synthesis beyond control fed values. And glucose supplementation restored FSR as effi-ciently as glutamine (G10).

Carbhohydrate or BCAA supplementation prevents decrease in glutamine levels during exercise
-Carbohydrate supplementation affects positively the immune response of cyclists by avoiding or minimizing changes in plasma glutamine concentration (G11).
-Following an exercise bout, a decrease in plasma glutamine concentration can be observed, which is completely abolished by BCAA supplementation (G12).
-BCAA supplementation during a triathlon completely prevents the decrease in plasma glutamine (G13).


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Seabiscuit Hogg
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01/05/2019 1:30 pm  

Wow. Excellent info! Thanks for posting it.

Seabiscuit Hogg is a fictious internet character. It is not recommended that you receive medical advice from fictious internet characters.

SBH :)


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Bigr
 Bigr
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01/05/2019 1:32 pm  

Edit:
Added glutamine hardly ever makes it to your muscle.
And glutamine does not prevent exercise induced immune impairment.


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Seabiscuit Hogg
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01/05/2019 1:49 pm  
Posted by: Big'r
Edit:
Added glutamine hardly ever makes it to your muscle.
And glutamine does not prevent exercise induced immune impairment.

You can improve glutamine absorbtion by taking it as you would creatine..........with malto, postworkout. This still doesn't help with the first pass problem.

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by Admin

Seabiscuit Hogg is a fictious internet character. It is not recommended that you receive medical advice from fictious internet characters.

SBH :)


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