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liftsiron
(@liftsiron)
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02/09/2020 3:15 pm  

Protein Power: Nine simple guidelines
Show me a bodybuilder who is afraid of eating a lot of protein and I will show you a bodybuilder who is afraid of success. Protein is the key element in your physique building bag of tricks, the difference between taking baby steps in your bodybuilding career and making giant leaps.
Before making protein the main ingredient of your bodybuilding diet, check out the following helpful tips on how to use protein under various circumstances.

By applying these simple guidelines to your plan of action, you will be able to get huge, yet hold on to your mass when dieting.

Rely on Protein for Anabolism
It is a no brainer: Total protein intake and total caloric intake will determine whether or not an anabolic (growth) state can exist. If you eat a lot of calories, carbs and fats without eating enough protein, you can kiss muscle growth goodbye.

Meet Minimum Protein Requirements
You must consume at least one gram (g) of protein per pound of bodyweight daily. A 200 pound bodybuilder needs a minimum of 200g of protein per day.

Be Aware of Maximum Protein Guidelines
This tip applies to hardgainers with fast metabolic rates. If you are blessed - or cursed - with a metabolism that forces you to burn protein for fuel, then increase daily protein intake to 1.5g per pound of bodyweight. Under these conditions, a 200 pound bodybuilder would consume 300g of protein per day.

Consume Complementary Carbs
Carbs are not complete anathema to a bodybuilder in pursuit of mass. Take in 2g of carbs per pound of bodyweight daily, unless you're dieting strictly. This will provide your body with sufficient carb stores to draw on for energy, instead of tapping into protein stores that should be reserved for muscle building.

Eat More Protein When You Diet
To get ripped to the max, you have to cut way back on dietary fat while reducing carb intake. This double whammy forces the body to burn more protein as fuel, which will put your muscle tissue at risk. Dieting bodybuilders should increase protein intake to 1.5g per pound of bodyweight to compensate for the reduction in carbohydrate.

Count Protein Grams
When calculating total grams of protein, include only complete sources, such as meat, fish and eggs. Disregard incomplete sources like oats, rice, bread and other grains.

Ignore the RDA Advice on Protein Intake
The Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for protein are inapplicable to bodybuilders, as are studies recommending .75g per pound of bodyweight. Such figures are typically calculated by experimenting with university students - a.k.a. recreational bodybuilders - and are well below the requirements for hardcore bodybuilders in training.

Use Protein Powders
I recommend protein powders that include fast acting whey, which is naturally dense in branched chain amino acids; slower acting casein, and ummune system enhancing soy, which is also high in glutamine.. These three sources sombined will yield a better net increase in mass than a single source powder such as casein alone. As a rule of thumb, try to get 50% of your protein intake from powders in order to accelerate absorption into muscle tissue.

Keep It Simple
The overcomplication of bodybuilding nutrition is ridiculous. Here is a simple edict to follow in pursuit of mass: Fix you protein intake at a minimum of 1g per pound of bodyweight, with a max of 1.5g for those of you with a fast metabolism or who are dieting like crazy. Then eat at least 2g of carbs per pound of bodyweight, and avoid all excess fats that are not already contained in your protein sources. If your bodyweight does not increase, add more carbs to the mix.

That is it! No magic bullets for mass; instead manipulation of protein and other nutrients offers just enough ammo for gaining size.
by Chris Aceto
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liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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liftsiron
(@liftsiron)
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02/09/2020 3:35 pm  

Although IMO, soy sucks.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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Seabiscuit Hogg
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02/09/2020 4:00 pm  

Good read but I agree with Lifts' opinion of soy.

Seabiscuit Hogg is a fictious internet character. It is not recommended that you receive medical advice from fictious internet characters.

SBH :)


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Bus King
(@bus-king)
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02/09/2020 4:22 pm  

good read. Very simple. I have read so many overcomplicated articles that even if I do understand them, I can't remember the guidelines a few days after reading it. Simple is always best.


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liftsiron
(@liftsiron)
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02/09/2020 4:43 pm  
Posted by: Bus King
good read. Very simple. I have read so many overcomplicated articles that even if I do understand them, I can't remember the guidelines a few days after reading it. Simple is always best.

Agreed!!!!

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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jboldman
(@jboldman)
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02/09/2020 5:11 pm  

============

J Appl Physiol. 2009 Sep;107(3):987-92. Epub 2009 Jul 9.

Ingestion of whey hydrolysate, casein, or soy protein isolate: effects on mixed muscle protein synthesis at rest and following resistance exercise in young men.
Tang JE, Moore DR, Kujbida GW, Tarnopolsky MA, Phillips SM.

Department of Kinesiology-Exercise Metabolism Research Group, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada.

Abstract
This study was designed to compare the acute response of mixed muscle protein synthesis (MPS) to rapidly (i.e., whey hydrolysate and soy) and slowly (i.e., micellar casein) digested proteins both at rest and after resistance exercise. Three groups of healthy young men (n = 6 per group) performed a bout of unilateral leg resistance exercise followed by the consumption of a drink containing an equivalent content of essential amino acids (10 g) as either whey hydrolysate, micellar casein, or soy protein isolate. Mixed MPS was determined by a primed constant infusion of l-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine. Ingestion of whey protein resulted in a larger increase in blood essential amino acid, branched-chain amino acid, and leucine concentrations than either casein or soy (P < 0.05). Mixed MPS at rest (determined in the nonexercised leg) was higher with ingestion of faster proteins (whey = 0.091 +/- 0.015, soy = 0.078 +/- 0.014, casein = 0.047 +/- 0.008%/h); MPS after consumption of whey was approximately 93% greater than casein (P < 0.01) and approximately 18% greater than soy (P = 0.067). A similar result was observed after exercise (whey > soy > casein); MPS following whey consumption was approximately 122% greater than casein (P < 0.01) and 31% greater than soy (P < 0.05). MPS was also greater with soy consumption at rest (64%) and following resistance exercise (69%) compared with casein (both P < 0.01). We conclude that the feeding-induced simulation of MPS in young men is greater after whey hydrolysate or soy protein consumption than casein both at rest and after resistance exercise; moreover, despite both being fast proteins, whey hydrolysate stimulated MPS to a greater degree than soy after resistance exercise. These differences may be related to how quickly the proteins are digested (i.e., fast vs. slow) or possibly to small differences in leucine content of each protein.


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liftsiron
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02/09/2020 5:33 pm  

10 whole grams wtf are they thinking. The weight training probably consisted of one set of leg extensions. We know casein digests slower so no surprise there. Soy looks good on paper but contains anti trypsin factors which inhibits protein absorption.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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liftsiron
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02/09/2020 6:02 pm  

Effect of Soybean Variety on Anti-Nutritional Factors Content, and Growth Performance and Nutrients Metabolism in Rat
Chunmei Gu,1 Hongbin Pan,2 Zewei Sun,3 and Guixin Qin3*
1Institute of Food Science and Engineering, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, Jilin 130118, China
2Institute of Animal Science and Technology, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650201, China
3Institute of Animal Science and Technology, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, Jilin 130118, China

Abstract
The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of soybean varieties on content of anti-nutritional factors, growth, and nutrient digestibility in rat. For this purpose, the content of trypsin inhibitor and lectin was firstly measured in five soybean varieties. Then sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups and fed on different diets as follows: groups 1 to 5 were fed on treatment diets containing five different varieties of soybean flour; group 6 was fed on a control diet containing casein. All animals were fed for four weeks. During this period, faeces and urine were collected to determine the nutritional efficiency of diets and body weight were measured weekly on ten rats from each group. The results showed that trypsin inhibitor and lectin content of Jilin45 was the highest, and those of Jinong7 were the lowest of the soybean varieties. In comparison, all measured parameters, that is including gain in body weight, feed utilization efficiency, nutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance and nitrogen retention, were markedly different among the five groups of animals, but were significantly lower than the control group. These findings show that soybean varieties could significantly affect trypsin inhibitor and lectin content in soybean.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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jboldman
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02/09/2020 6:32 pm  

notice my i could not resist posting that study. soy is junk imo!

jb


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liftsiron
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02/09/2020 6:50 pm  
Posted by: jboldman
notice my i could not resist posting that study. soy is junk imo!

jb

Yup I caught that.

I read the title of this study and thought holy shit!!!! After reading the study I thought WTF!!!!!! How can muscle mass decline or noticeably increase in ONE WEEK?

Low-carb protein diet causes muscles to grow without training

If you go over from a standard Western diet to a low-carb protein diet your muscles grow. Sports scientists at the University of Michigan discovered this when they did an experiment with 8 young men and women. And interestingly, the subjects did no weight training.

Insulin, textbooks continue to tell us, is an important anabolic hormone. Because your insulin level rises if you eat carbohydrates � the insulin level reacts less to glucose fed intravenously � scientists believed until recently that a low-carb diet reduces muscle mass. Empirical evidence and studies by anthropologists and archaeologists, however, indicate that the reverse is true.

That�s why these researchers decided to do an experiment in which 4 men and an equal number of women, average age 29, exchanged their standard diet for a low-carb protein diet for a week. The figures: the subjects� diet before starting consisted of 60 percent carbs, 30 percent fat and 10 percent protein [Before diet]. They replaced this with a diet consisting of 35 percent protein, 60 percent fat and only 5 percent carbohydrates.

The figure below shows that the diet caused a drastic lowering of the subjects� insulin level. You�ll notice how the insulin level peaked after the 3 main meals in the �Before diet�, but that on the low-carb protein diet the peaks have almost disappeared.
The manufacture of growth hormone decreased but the decline was not statistically significant. The same is true for the concentration of IGF-1in the bloodstream. Most of the IGF-1 found in the bloodstream comes from the liver cutting up growth hormone into smaller pieces.

You�d expect muscle mass to decline, but this didn�t happen. The researchers extracted cells from the vastus lateralis leg muscle and recorded the muscle tissue growth. This actually increased after the subjects went over to the low-carb diet.

The protein diet had increased the activity of anabolic signal molecules in the muscle cells. The most noticeable effect was that the muscle cells started to produce more IGF-1. This is different IGF-1 to that found in the bloodstream.

Ok, but insulin is an anabolic hormone. But the increased activity of anabolic mechanisms in the muscle cells as a result of a low-carb protein diet outweighs the disappearance of insulin. "Increasing dietary protein content during a carbohydrate restricted diet may be important for preventing or attenuating a net loss of body protein", the researchers conclude.

Source:
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Sep; 90(9): 5175-81.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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Trevdog
(@trevdog)
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02/09/2020 7:07 pm  

Good article and a very interesting study on whey vs. casein vs. soy. Soy does look like junk after reading that article.

I had believed that caseinate had its place as a slow digesting protein and I haven't let go of that entirely but wow whey really showed its stuff in that study!


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liftsiron
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02/09/2020 7:27 pm  

casein is a very good protein anytime except right after your workout.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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Seabiscuit Hogg
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02/09/2020 7:55 pm  

I take in the most casein during my last meal in the evening. This helps with your main recovery.....SLEEP

Agreed I like to eat fat free cottage cheese also in the evening.

Seabiscuit Hogg is a fictious internet character. It is not recommended that you receive medical advice from fictious internet characters.

SBH :)


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Trevdog
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02/09/2020 8:25 pm  

I agree. I include casein in shakes I have before bed. I generally use 100% whey before, during, and after lifting.


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