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Two eggs a day ‘does not increase cholesterol levels’  

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HOTROCKS
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05/06/2020 7:08 pm  

MedWire News: Eating two eggs a day, as part of an energy-restricted weight-loss diet, does not increase levels of ‘bad’ or total cholesterol, results of a UK study show.

“The observation that high intakes of dietary cholesterol can increase plasma [blood] cholesterol in a number of species has led to the belief that the intake of dietary cholesterol in humans should be restricted,” said lead researcher Dr Nicola Harman, from the University of Surrey in Guildford.

“However, energy-restricted diets, that may contain a relatively high proportion of fat and cholesterol, have been shown to produce neutral or in some cases favourable effects on plasma cholesterol,” she added.

Dr Harman and team recruited 45 participants, aged an average of 44 years and with an average initial body mass index of 29.5 kg/m2, who were assigned to follow an energy-restricted diet including two eggs a day or the same diet excluding eggs for a period of 12 weeks.

The participants’ cholesterol levels and weight were measured at the start of the study and again at 6 and 12 weeks.

At 12 weeks, participants in both groups had lost significant amounts of weight. Indeed, the 24 participants with the egg-based diet had lost an average of 3.3 kg and the 21 participants assigned to the diet without eggs had lost an average of 4.4 kg.

Furthermore, over the 12-week period, total cholesterol levels fell by an average 0.225 mmol/l in the egg-based diet group and by 0.266 mmol/l in the other group. Similarly, levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol fell by 0.125 mmol/l and 0.160 mmol/l, respectively.

Dr Harman conceded that the study was small, but said that their results should give people who are trying to lose weight the confidence to include eggs as part of their daily diet.

"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
- Albert Einstein


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jboldman
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05/06/2020 7:31 pm  

i can attest that eating 12 a day will raise your cholesterol! i think is you have an issue with cholesterol you might want to stay away from eggs as a rule. for those whose chlosterol is under control, a few eggs wvery once in a while will most likely not hurt.


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pillsbury
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05/06/2020 7:54 pm  

how many eggs can you eat comfortably without chol climbing? it must be genetic bc i eat bet 2-3 dz a week with no rise. i get mine from a local farm so depending on where yours or others come from i suppose the profile and make up of the egg would be different.


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liftsiron
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05/06/2020 8:16 pm  
Posted by: pillsbury
how many eggs can you eat comfortably without chol climbing? it must be genetic bc i eat bet 2-3 dz a week with no rise. i get mine from a local farm so depending on where yours or others come from i suppose the profile and make up of the egg would be different.

I agree genetic factors play a big factor in high chol. I don't eat fatty red meat but I eat a ton of eggs and maintain very low chol and triglycerides.

liftsiron is a fictional character and should be taken as such.


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jboldman
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05/06/2020 8:46 pm  

agreed, genetics really plays an important part.


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srmbiker
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05/06/2020 9:13 pm  

Actually this in line with what a professor in gastrointestinal physiology lecturing us said. It was a year ago, and you get taught a lot in a year, and this was not my forte.
But if i remember correctly (and I will look this up this weekend and have proper referencing )

Dietary cholesterol, relatively speaking, didn't play much of a role in cholesterol levels in the body, probably due to negative feedback pathways, ie, exogenous cholesterol shifted the reaction in the reverse direction, negating the effect.

But saturated fats on the other hand............. the precursor to cholesterol synthesis! Put them in the diet, they get metabolised in the liver and some of it (how much? I don't remember proportions or if it's equal in whole body caloric excess or caloric deficiency) gets converted to cholesterol.

x + y <--> z
Supply z, it will drive the reaction to x + y (directly? or indirectly via cell signalling), or slow down the rate of the forward reaction. Supply x, and you drive the forwards reaction.

z being cholesterol, x being saturated fats in this case.


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srmbiker
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05/06/2020 9:43 pm  

Come to think of it, I notice something here:

(I'll call them "egg consumers" and "non egg consumers") that study points out that the egg consumers did not lose as much weight as the non egg consumers.

And also, the egg consumers did not lower their cholesterol levels as much as the non egg consumers.

I have to ponder, is it the presence of the eggs that caused the plasma cholesterol levels to not drop as much? Or is that attributed to the weight loss? ie, if the egg consumers lost equal weight, would their cholesterol losses be the same as their non consuming counterparts? Would be interesting to know that's for sure....


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TwoWheels
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05/06/2020 10:13 pm  

Lots of missing info like what was the total daily intake of saturated fat in the egg consumers vs non egg eaters? Then like Jb mentions those with unfortunate genetics that have a predisposition to high cholesterol levels can muddy the waters even more.

Remembering that eggs contain both cholesterol and saturated fat so if dietary intake of saturated fat is already high then adding 1doz eggs p/day to the mix would likely raise anybodies cholesterol levels given enough time.
I have eaten 2-3 doz eggs p/wk for over 2 decades and cutting saturated fat back to 20g or less p/day mostly by using non/low fat dairy dairy and avoiding lots of processed foods; cakes, buscuits, sausages chocolate etc but not worrying about dietary intake of cholesterol has my levels now at the lowest levels ever.

So in my case the culprate was saturated fat not eggs or foods high in cholesterol, which is in line what the National Heart Foundation in my country has been advocating for quite some time now.


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pillsbury
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05/06/2020 10:39 pm  

hmm...
but how many people have grown up eating nothing but sausage, meat, eggs, mik that have perfect blood profile and live to be older than dirt. there are plenty of farmers in my area who can attest to this


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Seabiscuit Hogg
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05/06/2020 11:05 pm  

Good question. I remember when there weren't many lowfat foods. Most ppl ate this way and there were't as many obese ppl running around.

Seabiscuit Hogg is a fictious internet character. It is not recommended that you receive medical advice from fictious internet characters.

SBH :)


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TwoWheels
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05/06/2020 11:28 pm  

Very true, but would they live longer if cholesterol levels were even lower? Who knows, l'd still prefer to keep mine at the very low end of normal levels.
Going by modern science though the theory is by reducing saturated fat and so reducing Cholesterol levels the risk factor for stroke/heart disease goes down especially if there is a history of heart disease in the family.
So these people may well be in the "ok" range as far as cholesterol levels go but by reducing their saturated fat intake their levels should certainly drop from "ok" to "great" thus reducing their risk factors even further, at least that's what l am hearing and reading from the so called "experts"
l have often wondered what the highest levels of cholesterol in a living human has been recorded at.


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Bananaman
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05/06/2020 11:55 pm  

a moderatley rasied cholesterol level on its own doesn't cause cardiologists too much concern (apart from familial hypercholestetolaemia). However if you have multiple risk factors, the effect on the heart is synergystic, thats when things start to get interesting- cholesterol is easy to treat & a big earner for pharma companies, hence the recent massive interest!


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headdoc
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06/06/2020 12:22 am  

My CHOL was in the 180's for a long period of time. Last year I started Paleo type diet: reduce or eliminate grains, dairy, add more nuts, seeds. Otherwise fruits, veggies, lean protein. My Chol dropped to 172 by 11/09 and 159 by 4/10. I eat 2-3 eggs per day. My exercise did not very for the past 18 months.

And we'll collect the moments one by one. I guess that's how the future's done. Feist, "Mushaboom", 2005


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headdoc
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06/06/2020 12:41 am  

It may be the way that I eat eggs. Never or hardly ever by themselves. Most often I scramble the eggs w. minced garlic, sundried tomatoes, roasted peppers, and a few cups of spinach. I serve this allong w. half a sweet potato. Maybe the fiber captures the CHOL?

And we'll collect the moments one by one. I guess that's how the future's done. Feist, "Mushaboom", 2005


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HOTROCKS
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06/06/2020 1:11 am  

Hey Doc !
Did you know that an egg is a pain in the ass to a chicken ?

"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
- Albert Einstein


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