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cycling and steroids

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(@xcircuittrainerx)
New Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 1
Topic starter  

anybody know what type of steroids cyclists usually take?


   
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newjuicer
(@newjuicer)
Trusted Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 50
 

I don't mean to be rude, but bro, you're in the wrong board; cyclist are skinny m...fu...rs and don´t deserve the priviledge to use gear! In fact, it's a m...fu...ing waste or juice. the right question on this board is: you know on what is ronnie coleman?


   
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Hardcoregrowth1
(@hardcoregrowth1)
Trusted Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 71
 

Well thats a dumbass thing to say. To answer the original post, many endurance athletes use winstrol. It tends to heighten endurance, and in cycling, endurance is key. At one time I ran track, and it was awesome for endurance. Study compounds first before using anything though.


   
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eqbuff
(@eqbuff)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 20
 

winstrol for sure.....maybe even Anavar......and i agree with hardcore man....he asked a legitimate question bro.....chill


   
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(@tobikerboy)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 9
 

newjuicer: that post made you sound like a fool..


   
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(@tobikerboy)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 9
 

In 2001, Italian police raided riders' hotel rooms during the Giro d'Italia, the Italian Tour. They found hundreds of illegal drugs. As the raid progressed, a surreal scene unfolded. Syringes began raining down on the heads of police in the parking lot of the hotel. Desperate riders were trying to get rid of the evidence. It merely confirmed the comment of a former rider and now a coach on the Tour: "A pro rider without a syringe is like a majorette without a baton: inconceivable. They go together." What drives the surreal circus is money. The Tour de France is now a massive business. The winner becomes a millionaire. Even the also-rans become rich. Towns pay, and pay heavily, to have the Tour pass their way. The town of Cluses paid more than $150,000 to have the Tour overnight this year. It hoped to get it all back and more in money spent by tourists drawn like flies to the race. Add to those sums the European television rights... In 2002, Tour organizers announced the most rigorous drug testing regime ever. More than 150 random tests were carried out. No illegal substances were found. Not one. And then, on the last day of the Tour, French police checked another car, this one leaving for Switzerland. It was driven by the wife of Raimondas Rumsas, a Lithuanian cyclist and the surprise third-place finisher of the race. In the trunk was a temperature-controlled suitcase. It contained another pharmacy: steroids, testosterone, EPO, growth hormones and 35 other products. Edita Rumsas was arrested. Providing such drugs to riders without medical reasons is illegal in France. Rather than fly to his wife's side, Rumsas flew to Italy, the home of his team. From there he protested his innocence and offered a comforting explanation for all the drugs. His wife was taking them back to Lithuania to his mother-in-law who was sick. "If my mother-in-law had taken all this stuff," one French prosecutor said, "she might have climbed on the winner's podium of the Tour as well." For the record, an American won the race. His name is Lance Armstrong and he has won the last four Tours. Indeed a Frenchman hasn't won this race since 1985. Armstrong's is an uplifting story. He recovered from cancer to return to cycling and to his position of present dominance. Yet as he climbed Mont Ventoux this year, French spectators jeered at him. They yelled "dopé, dopé" (doped, doped). Armstrong insists he is "clean, clean, clean," and disgusted. "Instead of people encouraging you, you have them jumping in the road, making hand signals, drunk out of their minds, fat bellies. If I had a dollar for every time somebody hollers: 'dopé, dopé,' I'd be a rich man."


   
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