Question on testosterone and cortisone.  

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 Bigr
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19/10/2018 3:48 pm  

Is urinary excretion of cortisone a standard for blood plasma cortisone levels?

FROM THIS STUDY:

Comparison between Testosterone Enanthate-induced azoospermia and oligozoospermia in a male contraceptive study. III. Higher 5 alpha-reductase activity in oligozoospermic men administered supraphysiological doses of testosterone.

The administration of exogenous testosterone (T) to eugonadal men causes suppression of gonadotropin secretion and thus of spermatogenesis. This is currently being investigated as a possible method of hormonal male contraceptive, but complete suppression of spermatogenesis to azoospermia is induced in only 50-70% of Caucasian men; the remainder maintain a low rate of spermatogenesis. The basis for this polymorphism in response is unclear. The enzyme 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha R) converts T to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and is important in determining the magnitude of the androgen stimulus in some tissues. We investigated whether the maintenance of spermatogenesis in men remaining oligozoospermic while receiving suppressive doses of T is associated with evidence of increased 5 alpha R activity. Thirty-three normal men were given 200 mg T enanthate (TE), im, weekly in a clinical trial of hormonal male contraception. The MCR of T (MCRT) and the conversion ratio of T to DHT (CRT-DHT) were measured by infusion of [3H]T, plasma levels of DHT and androstanediol glucuronide (AdiolG) were measured by RIA, and 24-h urinary steroid metabolites were measured by capillary column gas chromatography. Sperm density decreased in all men; 18 achieved azoospermia by 20 weeks of treatment, and the remainder had a mean sperm density of 2.0 +/- 0.8 x 10(5)/mL at that time. This treatment caused increases in plasma T levels and MCRT, but with no differences between azoospermic and oligozoospermic responders. There were no differences in CRT-DHT plasma DHT, or AdiolG before treatment, but after 16 weeks, CRT-DHT had increased in the oligozoospermic responders, but not in the azoospermic responders. TE treatment increased plasma DHT and AdiolG levels in both groups, but the increases in both 5 alpha R metabolites were significantly greater in the oligozoospermic responders. Urinary excretion of etiocholanolone and androsterone was increased after 16 weeks of TE treatment, but did not differ between the two groups, andetiocholanolone/androsterone ratios did not differ greatly from unity. There was no change in urinary excretion of tetrahydrocortisol, allo-tetrahydrocortisol, or cortisone after 16 weeks of TE treatment in either group. These results suggest that after TE administration there is a selective increase in 5 alpha R activity in those men who remain oligozoospermic, but not in those becoming azoospermic. This difference in the androgenic milieu may underlie the incomplete suppression in the oligozoospermic responders, in whom a low rate of spermatogenesis is maintained despite the apparent absence of gonadotropins.

PIP: The administration of exogenous testosterone (T) to eugonadal men causes suppression of gonadotropin secretion and thus of spermatogenesis. This is currently being investigated as a possible method of hormonal male contraceptive, but complete suppression of spermatogenesis to azoospermia is induced in only 50-70% of Caucasian men; the remainder maintain a low rate of spermatogenesis. The basis for this polymorphism in response is unclear. The enzyme 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha R) converts T to dibydrotestosterone (DHT) and is important in determining the magnitude of the androgen stimulus in some tissues. We investigated whether the maintenance of spermatogenesis in men remaining oligozoospermic while receiving suppressive doses of T is associated with evidence of increased (TE), im, weekly in a clinical trial of hormonal male contraception. The MCR of T (MCRT) and the conversion ratio of T to DHT (CRT-DHT) were measured by infusion of [3H]T, plasma levels of DHT and androstanediol glucuronide (AdiolG) were measured by RIA, and 24-h urinary steroid metabolites were measured by capillary column gas chromatography. Sperm density decreased in all men; 18 achieved azoospermia by 20 weeks of treatment, and the remainder had a mean sperm density of 2.0 +/- 0.8 x and MCRT, but with no differences between azoospermic and oligozoospermic responders. There were no differences in CRT-DHT plasma DHT, or AdiolG before treatment, but after 16 weeks, CRT-DHT had increased in the oligozoospermic responders, but not in the azoospermic responders. TE treatment increased plasma DHT and AdiolG levels in both groups, but the increases in both 5 alpha R metabolites were significantly greater in the oligozoospermic responders. Urinary excretion of etiocholanolone and androsterone was increased after 16 weeks of TE treatment, but did not differ between the two groups, andetiocholanolone/androsterone ratios did not differ greatly from unity. There was no change in urinary excretion of tetrahydrocortisol, allo-tetrahydrocortisol, or cortisone after 16 weeks of TE treatment in either group. These results suggest that after TE administration there is a selective increase in 5 alpha R activity in those men who remain oligozoospermic, but not in those becoming azoospermic. This difference in the androgenic milieu may underlie the incomplete suppression in the oligozoospermic responders, in whom a low rate of spermatogenesis is maintained despite the apparent absence of gonadotropins.In the UK, physicians recruited 33 healthy men aged 21-41 to a clinical trial of weekly intramuscular injections of 200 mg testosterone enanthate (TE) (Testoviron) for up to 18 months. 18 (55%) of the men achieved azoospermia after 20 weeks of treatment. The sperm density in the remaining 15 men (45%) stabilized at a mean density of 2(+or- 0.8) million/ml and stayed oligozoospermic for the remainder of the clinical trial. Plasma samples taken immediately before and 1, 2, 4, and 7 days after the 1st and 16th TE injections and after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment allowed the researchers to compare the activity of 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR). 5alphaR converts T to the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and plays a key role in determining the magnitude of the androgen stimulus in some tissues. Exogenous testosterone (T) increased plasma T levels and the mean conversion rate of T (MCRT), but there were no differences between azoospermic and oligozoospermic men. Before treatment there were no differences in plasma DHT and androstanediol glucuronide (AdiolG) levels between the two groups. After 16 weeks, the conversion ratio of T to DHT (CRT-DHT) increased in oligozoospermic men (3.1% vs. 4%; p 0.05) but not in azoospermic men, whereas before treatment it was essentially the same in both groups. Exogenous T significantly increased both plasma DHT and AdiolG levels in both groups, but the increases in both these 5alphaR metabolites were significantly higher in oligozoospermic men than azoospermic men (p 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). After 16 weeks of tr

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triguy
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19/10/2018 4:43 pm  

bump interested


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buffedude
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19/10/2018 5:28 pm  

There is still some controversy as to which body fluid (serum, urine or saliva) is best for hormonal testing. In terms of steroidal hormones 24 hour urine measurements are more accurate than serum. When it comes to cortisol testing, 24 hour urinary testing is definitely the test of choice, mainly due to the daily fluctuations of cortisol secretion from the adrenals.
FYI: for some other hormones (such as testosterone) salivary testing may be better than serum testing, especially if only total serum measurements are done (vs. free or unbound testosterone measurements).


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Bigr
 Bigr
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19/10/2018 6:03 pm  
Posted by: buffedude
There is still some controversy as to which body fluid (serum, urine or saliva) is best for hormonal testing. In terms of steroidal hormones 24 hour urine measurements are more accurate than serum. When it comes to cortisol testing, 24 hour urinary testing is definitely the test of choice, mainly due to the daily fluctuations of cortisol secretion from the adrenals.
FYI: for some other hormones (such as testosterone) salivary testing may be better than serum testing, especially if only total serum measurements are done (vs. free or unbound testosterone measurements).

Thanx for your reply!

My knowledge on hormones is limited, but is it anywhere safe to assume (from this study) that there doesn't seem to be a catabolic state following TEST administration (leaving suppressed endogenous test out of the picture).

Could you tell me if the other measured hormones might reflect a catabolic state in any way?


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