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Question re protein powder


Musclechick
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Do you think you can over supplement with protein powder ie have too many protein powder meals per day. Can some people wind up being fatter for it? Interested to hear your thoughts.


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bigock
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inho mc, its all calories in versus calories out, however i do not prescribe to the theory of a calorie is a calorie, i beleive that the quality of calorie has alot to do with it. I would rather be taking extra protein powder than a simple sugar meal like a mars bar for example. Also I personally beleive that the human body was designed to chew, so taking too many liquid meals is not the best way to get your protein. Now to answer your question lol. yes i suppose you could get fat from your above scenario Bigock


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pacesetter
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If its high in carbs I'm sure it would as some powders that I am aware of a higher in carbs than others. Also if you take in maintenance level calories from foods alone and augment your caloric intake with protein powder regardless of how many carbs are in it, then you surely can put on fat for it. Too many calories still result in increased bf, period.


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Aussie
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Well M.C. from what I understand protein is the third food product that your body will turn into fat. Of course first is simple fat, second is if you have excess carbo-hydrates. Your body finds it easier to turn carbos into fat then protein. However in theory it would be possible to "over supplement" your protein but it does take the body a lot more time to process it down to fat. Just my 2 cents hope I helped


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test-xtreme
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its all about quality, if the powders are good quality they should be utilised more eficiently there fore not leave exess waste in the body again the concept of more in then more out is a factor because even protein if in excess of ones dietry needs will store as fat for later use, thats how the body works,,, but i solely use protein powders as a convenience thing rather then replacement for real food ie..chicken/tuna/lean meats good luk with MC TEST


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Musclechick
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I agree as long as its not a high carb/calorie one and no more than about 3 meals of it - its a good supplementation. A lot of people criticise the fact that I have so many meals of it I was just interested to hear what others thought.


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cannibal007
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Protein has the lowest(highest?) TEF (Thermic effect of food). The body uses more calories to process protein than either carbs or fat. Therefore 3000kcal of protein would have a lower amount of "usable" calories than carbs or fat. So a diet high in protein calories is less likely to have excess "useable" calories than one high in carbs or fat, due to the calories expended in the processing of the protein. I think about 24-26% of calories from protein are used in processing, as opposed to 3% for fats.


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Aussie
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yeah Can. Just like a said ....just in a dumb version for a dumb person (me 🙂 )


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cannibal007
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Sorry Aussie, was cooking pancakes(mmm pancakes) when typing post so took about half hour to put in. Was no posts at that time, half dozen by time finished it, incl yours which said exact same thing! Now for some garlic bread! (post comp binge,was to be one day, has become 5)


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sp123
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Musclechick, As bigock said, it is calories in versus calories out. You said protein powder, so I am assuming carbs and fats are minimal. This being the case, the only way you will gain fat is from excess calories. With the TEF of protein being about 25% and also the last macronutrient to be stored as fat, you should be safe. You should be getting your protein from whole food sources and only supplement when you can not achieve this with whole foods. Being a female, I am not sure what your daily protein intake is, but 150-200g is easily achievable through whole foods. Instead of having protein supplements on their own, you should try adding a 1/2 serving to some whole foods to boost the amino acid profile. (eg) 100g of chicken and 20g of protein powder SP123


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davepuppies
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Bump although i am guilty of relying on shakes too much, you main source of protein should be from whole foods, as we all know.


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littlerunt
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MC i think it would depend on what powder you used and what you made it on, if you made your shakes on water and the powder was low in carbs you think it would be very hard to put fat on? like the fella's said calories in versus calories out.


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Amatuer
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There is one facter that I believe should be taken into account with calories in/out for fatloss/muscle gain. Total calories in and out will decide whether your body will gain muscle, or lose fat, or a combination of both (if your hardcore :p ). I am also a firm believer of frequency of meals, which I'm sure you all are, but this is a topic that nobody brings up in regards to total daily calories. For example, if you eat 2000 calories per day, bu tin two meals (ie. morning and night) then your going to store fat after the meal, your body will be catabolic inbetween the meals once the calories are processed, then again in the evening you will store more fat while only having little time to replenish glucose and build muscle. Frequency of meals and total calories = weight gain/loss My 0.02c


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