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High Rep Routine

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Durabolin
(@durabolin)
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Hi there, I want to give my body a break for a month and switch to a more endurance based routine. I was thinking 20 reps per set, 30 seconds rest only between sets. 4 sets per exercise. Here is the split.. upper body Mon and Thurs, lower tues and fri: Upper: Bench press/incline (alternate) Chin ups - I can do 35 so 4 sets of 20 should be ok, if not I would finish with pulldowns. Barbell rows Upright rows. Rope pushdowns EZ bar curls Good mornings/hyperextensions Decline situps/weighted leg raises. LOWER: Squats/Deadlifts Leg press Stiff leg deadlift Hamstring curls Donkey calf raises seated calf raises standing calf raises. Good mornings/hyperextensions Decline situps/weighted leg raise. Does this look OK? and do you think this would give my joints a break? I will lose size, maybe 10lbs or so but a welcome break


   
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BigWill
(@bigwill)
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Yes you will loose size, other wise known as muscle. Bass wrote that when he did a routine like this he lost something like 60% musclet and 40% fat. Too much muscle loss for me. Why not just take a week off?


   
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Durabolin
(@durabolin)
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Topic starter  

Thanks for the reply BigWill - I need about a month or so break, so it is kind of dmage limitation. If I took that month completely off I'd lose more muscle and put on fat. I figured this was a good half way compromise


   
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ngc_85
(@ngc_85)
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i understand where the logic is...and i dont know why you need a break, BUT why not just tone down the intensity a bit and try to maintain what you've got and just eat more and get some rest. you'll probably come back stronger than before.


   
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(@cajun_satan)
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NGC, I think the point is this; lifting 300lbs and failing at the 5th rep is much harder on the JOINTS than lifting 150lbs and failing at 30. Yes, you are still reaching muscular failure, but the actual weight you are placing on your joints is less. I think that is the reasoning for lowering the weight and increasing the reps. I think the strategy is sound, but depending on how long Dura has been exercising, it might make just as much sense to take 2 weeks off completely then start light and work his way back up. I have acutally taken a two week break after 6 months of hard lifting and come back stronger. Keepin the Peace, Cajun_Satan


   
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kapn
 kapn
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i'd say keep the reps at 15 but with a weight you would fail at 18-20 with..... i do this when i need a few weeks break and i dont want to be out of the gym.. when you do higher reps then normal make sure to replenish the extra carbs you depleted as oppesed to a regular workout so you dont lose size. works for me.


   
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Durabolin
(@durabolin)
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Topic starter  

Thanks for the replies. Kapn I will try 15 reps as you said I think.


   
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the iron addict
(@the-iron-addict)
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Once upon a time, I would have said you were trying to be a pussy, and lift girl weights. Today, I still say four sets is too many if they are actually hard sets (meaning the last reps are the last you could really do). Today I will also have to concede that if they are not all out sets, yet still "hard" sets, 4 may be an OK number of sets to do while stimulating growth, yet not doing all too much. After training COUNTLESS people throughout the years, I will also state without hesitation that the high reps may be EXAXCTLY what Joe average, with more than average slow twitch muscle fiber composition needs to really hit the muscle. And while I favor 12-15 reps to do this, I train some people, for SOME muscles with the higher rep ranges with ASTONDING success. People freak when the muscle they never saw grow before explodes in growth from a set or two of high rep, many times a 12/18, or 15/30 rest-pause set. Targeting the muscle fiber type you are predominately made of does wonders compared to endlessly trying to hit the fast-twitch fiber you don't have. And yes, innervation gains accrue that way over time, but most people want a little size to go with the strength. Higher rep training is a great idea if: You KNOW you are targeting mostly slow twitch muscles. AND MORE IMPORTANTLY, YOU ALREADY HAVE PAID YOUR DUES LAYING A BASIC FOUNDATION OF STRENGHT. Iron Addict


   
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Data
 Data
(@data)
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Think more in terms of time under tension. In the short term, one or two workouts, taking sets past 120 seconds may produce some immediate growth. Probably inflamation but hey you look bigger and thats the goal right. Over the long term, its not a good idea to take sets past 90-100 seconds for most people. The majority of muscle groups respond best to around 3/4 to 1.5 minute sets. Instead of thinking about reps, think about time under tension. An 8 rep set of squats taking 10 seconds per rep (4/1/4/1) is A LOT different than a 8 rep set of squats taking 2-3 seconds to lift and lower yourself. Another example ... I use to perform one rep chins ... taking 30 seconds to slowly lift myself and fight a 30 second negative. With that being said, I frequently squat with 15 to 20 reps. Its very demanding on your cardiorespiratory system. Its a hard change. Both my shoulders and my thighs respond best to longer sets.


   
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Data
 Data
(@data)
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One last thing ... just stick with one muscle group. Try a longer duration for your lower body. After four to six workouts return to a normal rep range and try some high rep back work. Etc.


   
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BigWill
(@bigwill)
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Originally posted by Data Think more in terms of time under tension. Actually the jury is still out on this one.


   
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Data
 Data
(@data)
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Originally posted by BigWill Actually the jury is still out on this one. Yeah you Americans are always a bit behind ...


   
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BigWill
(@bigwill)
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Actually we deal more with facts. Check out Journal of Strength and Conditioning Res. 15: 309-314, 2001.


   
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(@erm1981)
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actually doing to many reps just fatigues your muscles and overtrains them.........just take a week off every 8 weeks or so and youll be fine


   
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(@erm1981)
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Originally posted by cajun_satan NGC, I think the point is this; lifting 300lbs and failing at the 5th rep is much harder on the JOINTS than lifting 150lbs and failing at 30. Yes, you are still reaching muscular failure, but the actual weight you are placing on your joints is less. I think that is the reasoning for lowering the weight and increasing the reps. I think the strategy is sound, but depending on how long Dura has been exercising, it might make just as much sense to take 2 weeks off completely then start light and work his way back up. I have acutally taken a two week break after 6 months of hard lifting and come back stronger. Keepin the Peace, Cajun_Satan yes you will if you keep your nutrition straight when your off


   
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